Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

U.S. patients

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Telephone requests

Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Arizona

  1. 800-344-6296 (toll-free)
  2. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  3. Mountain time
  4. Monday through Friday
Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida

  1. 904-956-3309
  2. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  3. Eastern time
  4. Monday through Friday
Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minnesota

  1. 866-249-1648 (toll-free)
  2. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  3. Central time
  4. Monday through Friday

Mayo Clinic's kidney transplant doctors and surgeons use proven innovations to successfully treat people with kidney failure and complications of diabetes and other diseases. Their experience in using minimally invasive surgery, new medicines to prevent organ rejection and specialized procedures makes Mayo Clinic a leader in transplant outcomes.

Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including for people with very challenging kidney conditions who need special solutions and surgeries. And Mayo Clinic kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders in living donor kidney transplants. People who receive a kidney from a living donor usually have fewer complications than do those who receive a kidney from a deceased donor.

Mayo Clinic's experts focus on your needs, bringing to your situation the strength of their:

  • Experience. Mayo Clinic's kidney transplant team is recognized nationally and internationally for its expertise in comprehensive specialty treatment for people with serious kidney conditions. Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States.
  • Teamwork. Mayo's kidney transplant specialists are focused on your needs and your family's needs. They collaborate with you and a multidisciplinary team of doctors in endocrinology, infectious disease management and other specialties to provide the most appropriate treatment.

    By working together, your surgeons, doctors, transplant nurses, pharmacists, social workers and others manage every aspect of your kidney transplant, from planning through post-surgical care.

  • Advanced technology. Mayo Clinic doctors and surgeons use innovations and complex procedures available at only a select few institutions. And they have advanced the science and clinical practice of transplantation, including paired donation, multiorgan transplants, living-donor transplants and kidney transplant before dialysis is needed (preemptive transplant).

    Mayo Clinic kidney doctors and surgeons also have expertise in many other areas of kidney transplantation. For example, if paired donation isn't an option for you, they may talk with you about anti-HLA antibody, ABO incompatible or positive crossmatch transplants.

  • Innovative research. Our scientists and physicians are involved in research that makes transplants safer and available to more people. At Mayo Clinic, you may have access to ongoing clinical trials and new treatments.

    Every day the Transplant Research Center brings together specialist surgeons, diabetes doctors (endocrinologists), experts in human cell therapy and other experts many from other institutions — to collaborate.

Mayo Clinic surgeons perform kidney transplants at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Kidney transplant in children is provided at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. At Mayo Clinic's campus in Arizona, doctors partner with Phoenix Children's Hospital to treat children who may need kidney transplants.

Services

Mayo Clinic kidney doctors and surgeons work with a multidisciplinary team to determine the most appropriate treatment for you. They have expertise treating people in many areas of kidney transplantation, including those listed below. Not all services are available at each of Mayo Clinic's three campuses, in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Please confirm when you call to request an appointment.

Mayo Clinic kidney transplant doctors and surgeons are experts in treating kidney disease. You may come to Mayo Clinic on your own or with a referral from your doctor. Kidney transplant specialists work with a team of doctors and specialists in other areas to determine the most appropriate treatment option for you.

Mayo Clinic provides services for kidney failure caused by many diseases, including but not limited to those listed below. Availability of the services may vary among Mayo Clinic locations. Please confirm when you call to request an appointment.

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

Find doctors and medical staff:

Arizona doctors by specialty

Kidney and pancreas transplant

Abdominal (kidney, pancreas and liver) transplant surgeons
Kidney and pancreas transplant specialists

Florida doctors by specialty

Kidney and pancreas transplant

Kidney specialists
Surgeons

Minnesota doctors by specialty

Kidney and pancreas transplant

Kidney transplant specialists

Kidney and pancreas transplant surgeons

Each year, Mayo's doctors and surgeons diagnose and treat thousands of people who have kidney disease. Mayo Clinic's Kidney Transplant Program is among the largest in the country. And our kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders and innovators in living-donor kidney transplantation.

People with challenging health situations come to Mayo Clinic for help, even those who have been unable to find a compatible donor kidney. Our doctors and surgeons are experts in several kidney transplant options, such as those listed below. And Mayo has one of the largest paired-donor programs in the United States. Success in this program might reduce your time on the waiting list for a donor kidney. If no match is found for you through kidney paired donation, Mayo doctors might have other options to consider with you.

Mayo Clinic surgeons have been performing kidney transplants since 1963. They have completed thousands of successful surgeries and contributed to the science of transplantation, making kidney transplants safer and available to more people.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for diabetes and endocrinology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., is ranked highly performing for diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals in diabetes and endocrinology.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's quality rankings.

The Village at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, offers low-cost housing for transplant patients and their caregivers.

The Gabriel House of Care in Jacksonville, Florida, offers low-cost housing for transplant patients and their caregivers.

The Gift of Life Transplant House in Rochester, Minnesota, offers low-cost housing for transplant patients and their caregivers.

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Mayo Clinic scientists, doctors and surgeons develop kidney transplant insights and innovations that make transplants safer and available to more people. They conduct laboratory studies, clinical trials and other research on many aspects of transplantation. They often collaborate with colleagues nationally and overseas, sharing their insights to improve care for people everywhere:

  • Desensitization. Mayo Clinic kidney experts (nephrologists) were part of a national study that developed a procedure to alter people's immune systems so that they can accept kidneys from any donor. For some, this procedure — called desensitization — means less time waiting for an acceptable match and less time on dialysis.
  • Multiorgan advances. Mayo's kidney and diabetes experts are part of an international study to develop better methods for doing pancreas and kidney transplants together, improving outcomes for people with kidney failure due to complications of diabetes.

    And in another recent multiorgan research study, Mayo Clinic scientists found long-term benefits to the kidney in simultaneous liver-kidney transplant.

  • Paired donations. Mayo experts have assessed patient outcomes of the clinic's three-site kidney paired-donor program, improving this important and evolving transplant option.
  • Anti-rejection pioneers. And Mayo Clinic researchers were among the first to develop treatments to counteract antibodies to prevent rejection of a donor kidney with an incompatible blood type.

Read more about the many kidney transplant research studies supported by the Transplant Research Center.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic authors on kidney transplantation on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of Mayo Clinic transplant patients.

Kidney transplant costs and insurance information

Mayo Clinic has dedicated transplant financial services representatives and social workers who can assist you with insurance and financial questions regarding your transplant.

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. Many insurance companies require you to get preapproval authorization before receiving transplant services.

Insurance information

Before your transplant, it's important that you work closely with your insurance company to understand your benefit plan. You'll be responsible for any of your transplant and medical care costs not covered by your insurance company.

You may want to ask your insurance company several questions about your transplant expenses, such as:

  • What is the specific coverage of my plan? What are my deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, lifetime maximum amount, and annual maximum amounts for both medical care and transplant services?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period clause? If so, what is the time frame? Can this be waived?
  • Does my plan include pharmacy coverage? If so, will my plan cover my current medications and immunosuppressant medications?
  • Does my plan require any special approvals for evaluation or transplant? How long does the approval process take once submitted to insurance?
  • Does my plan cover my transportation and lodging expenses during my transplant care?
  • Does my insurance require enrollment in Medicare when I become eligible?
  • Does my insurance follow Medicare Coordination of Benefits Guidelines?
  • How will my coverage change after I enroll in Medicare? Will my plan become a supplemental or secondary plan?

If your plan is a Medicare supplement, ask questions such as:

  • Does my plan follow Medicare guidelines?
  • Does my plan cover Medicare Part A and Part B deductible and coinsurance?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period clause? If so, what is the time frame?
  • Does my plan offer an option for Medicare Part D coverage?

Other expenses

Please plan for other expenses that may occur related to your transplant. These may include, for example, follow-up medical appointments, long-term medications, caregiver expenses, travel, parking and lodging.

For international patients

Mayo Clinic has dedicated international patient account representatives who can assist you with questions regarding your costs and insurance. Read more about international financial services.

Case managers

Mayo Clinic financial staff will work closely with your case managers from your insurance company. Your case manager, who is assigned to you, is available to answer questions and calls related to your insurance costs.

Mayo Clinic doctors' experience and integrated team approach result in transplant outcomes that compare favorably with national averages. Teams work with transplant recipients before, during and after surgery to ensure the greatest likelihood of superior results.

Volumes and statistics are maintained separately for the three Mayo Clinic locations. Taken together or separately, transplant patients at Mayo Clinic enjoy excellent results.

Volumes

Arizona

A total of 298 kidney transplants were performed at Mayo Clinic in Arizona in 2017, including 62 living donor transplants. More than 3,000 kidney transplants have been performed since the program began in 1999.

Florida

A total of 148 kidney transplants were performed at Mayo Clinic in Florida in 2017, including 39 living donor transplants. Mayo Clinic in Florida has performed more than 1,800 kidney transplants in adults since the program began in April 2000. Transplants are done at Mayo Clinic hospital.

Minnesota

Surgeons at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota have completed more than 5,600 kidney transplants since 1963. Since 2006, more than 270 kidney transplants have been performed by kidney paired donation.

Mayo Clinic in Minnesota surgeons have performed more than 3,600 living donor kidney transplants since 1963 and more than 2,000 deceased donor kidney transplants since 1967.

Outcomes

Each of the links below connects to an external site, the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, which provides many metrics gathered from transplant programs across the United States.

Kidney Transplant — Adult

Kidney Transplant — Children

Kidney/Pancreas Transplant — Adult

People with chronic kidney disease who meet certain criteria of kidney function and those on dialysis are most appropriately treated with a kidney transplant. Chronic kidney disease may be caused by many medical conditions, including:

Your transplant team will evaluate you to determine whether a kidney transplant may be safe and beneficial for you. Your comprehensive evaluation will include blood tests, imaging scans and other tests. Doctors will check you for other serious conditions, including chronic infections, cancer, and heart and blood vessel (cardiovascular) disease.

Most people who are evaluated are determined to be eligible for a kidney transplant. Your doctors and transplant team will work with you to promote wellness, lower your risks and improve your outcome after kidney transplant. A care team member will talk with you about the importance of taking your immunosuppressant (anti-rejection) medications to keep your body from rejecting your kidney.

Sections

Jan. 17, 2018
References
  1. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. http://www.srtr.org/default.aspx. Accessed April 7, 2016.
  2. U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News Best Hospitals 2015-16. http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings. Accessed Feb. 22, 2016.
  3. Orandi BJ, et al. Kidney transplants from incompatible live donors. New England Journal of Medicine. 2016;374:940.
  4. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 5, 2016.
  5. Schinstock CA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 18, 2014.
  6. Lallas CD, et al. The development of a laparoscopic donor nephrectomy program in a de novo renal transplant program: Evolution of technique and results in over 200 cases. Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. 2006;10:135.
  7. Mai ML (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. April 26, 2016.
  8. Stulak JM, et al. Combined heart and abdominal organ transplantation: Excellent outcomes gained from a unique experience. Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2014;33:S278.
  9. Li H, et al. Assessing the efficacy of kidney paired donation — Performance of an integrated three-site program. Transplantation. 2014;98:300.
  10. Cornell LD, et al. Positive crossmatch kidney transplant recipients treated with eculizumab: Outcomes beyond 1 year. American Journal of Transplantation. 2015;15:1293.
  11. Shapiro R, et al. Benefits and complications of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  12. Polycystic kidney disease. National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/polycystic/. Accessed March 16, 2016.
  13. Raichlin E, et al. Combined heart and kidney transplantation provides an excellent survival and decreases risk of cardiac cellular rejection and coronary allograft vasculopathy. Transplantation Proceedings. 2011;43:1871.
  14. Heilman RL, et al. Steroid avoidance immunosuppression in low-risk kidney transplant recipients. Transplantation Proceedings. 2005;37:1785.
  15. Jay CL, et al. Reassessing preemptive kidney transplantation in the United States: Are we making progress? Transplantation. 20165;100:1120. http://www.transplantjournal.com. Accessed April 6, 2016.
  16. Bentall A, et al. Five-year outcomes in living donor kidney transplants with a positive crossmatch. American Journal of Transplantation. 2013;13:76.
  17. Prieto M (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 11, 2016.
  18. Dharnidharka VR, et al. Kidney transplantation in children. New England Journal of Medicine. 2014;371:549.
  19. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Your child's kidney transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  20. Kidney transplant team describes current work. Mayovox. 1967;18:24.
  21. Kudva YC (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 14, 2016.
  22. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Kidney transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  23. Rossi AP, et al. Evaluation of the potential renal transplant recipient. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 6, 2016.
  24. Cramer CH II (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 27, 2016.
  25. Li H, et al. The limits of paired donation — Who doesn't get transplanted? American Journal of Transplantation. 2013;13(suppl 5). http://www.atcmeetingsabstracts.com/abstract/limits-of-paired-donation-who-doesn’t-get-transplanted-the/. Accessed April 27, 2016.
  26. Crespo HS, et al. Kidney transplantation in the septuagenarian. American Journal of Transplantation. 2015;15(suppl 3). http://www.atcmeetingabstracts.com/abstract/kidney-transplantation-in-the-septuagenarian/. Accessed April 27, 2016.
  27. Taner T, et al. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney International. 2016:89:909.