Mayo Clinic Hispanic Transplant Program

The Hispanic population in the southwestern United States represents one of the largest cultural and ethnic groups in the nation. Mayo Clinic believes that culturally sensitive tailored educational initiatives for Hispanic patients with kidney failure will help them experience the best outcomes.

To this end, Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix, Arizona, has developed the Mayo Clinic Hispanic Transplant Program, a culturally tailored approach to kidney transplantation. At the start of their transplant evaluation, patients can elect to have Spanish-speaking transplant providers educate them and their families on the transplant process and living kidney donation in a small group setting. These sessions are aimed at providing information about both kidney transplantation and organ donation. The sessions emphasize cultural concerns that Hispanic patients have in pursuit of kidney transplant, myths about transplantation, and expectations about life as a kidney transplant recipient or as a living donor.

Learn more about kidney donation

Hispanic/Latino culturally relevant information and resources can be found at informate.org

This program will help address barriers to transplantation and organ donation by engaging and empowering family members early in the transplant process. Mayo Clinic has a long history of strong kidney transplant outcomes and aims to provide the highest level of care possible to transplant recipients and living donors. Hispanic people considering transplant here can look forward to excellent, culturally tailored care.

To get started, request an appointment at Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix, Arizona.

Sept. 11, 2018
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