Mayo Clinic's approach

  • Experience. Mayo Clinic staff in the Heart Rhythm Clinic has extensive experience and expertise in diagnosing and treating people with heart rhythm disorders.
  • Team approach. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in evaluating and treating cardiovascular diseases (cardiologists) and performing cardiac surgery (cardiovascular surgeons), as well as other doctors and staff, work closely to evaluate and treat people with heart rhythm conditions.
  • Efficient system. A detailed itinerary for appointments, tests and procedures lets you make the most of your time at the clinic. Mayo staff runs all tests and labs at Mayo Clinic, which means tests taken in the morning can be reviewed the same afternoon. This collaborative approach means doctors can often evaluate you and develop a treatment plan within two or three days.

Expertise and rankings

  • Heart rhythm disorders expertise. Doctors with expertise in heart rhythm disorders evaluate and treat people with heart rhythm disorders in the Heart Rhythm Clinic at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic doctors implant nearly 2,000 pacemakers each year.
  • Heart rhythm disorders research. Mayo Clinic doctors actively conduct research in heart rhythm disorders and new implantable devices and conduct clinical trials.
  • Comprehensive cardiovascular treatment and research. Doctors in Mayo Clinic's Cardiovascular Research Center are focused on developing cutting-edge diagnostic tests and innovative treatments for people with cardiovascular disease.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic campuses are nationally recognized for expertise in cardiology and cardiovascular surgery:

  • Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.
  • Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Children's Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.
  • Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.

With Mayo Clinic's emphasis on collaborative care, specialists at each of the campuses — Minnesota, Arizona and Florida — interact very closely with colleagues at the other campuses and the Mayo Clinic Health System.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's cardiac surgery and cardiovascular diseases departments' expertise and rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Dec. 29, 2017
References
  1. Artificial pacemaker. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Arrhythmia/PreventionTreatmentofArrhythmia/Artificial-Pacemaker_UCM_448480_Article.jsp#.VqmHgPkrLIU. Accessed Jan. 26, 2016.
  2. Marx JA, et al., eds. Implantable cardiac devices. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 26, 2016.
  3. Pacemaker. Heart Rhythm Society. http://www.hrsonline.org/Patient-Resources/Treatment/Pacemaker. Accessed Jan. 26, 2016.
  4. Gillis HM, et al. HRS/ACCF expert consensus statement on pacemaker device and mode selection. Rhythm. 2012;9:1344.
  5. What is a pacemaker? American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@hcm/documents/downloadable/ucm_300451.pdf. Accessed Jan. 26, 2016.
  6. Zipes DP, et al., eds. Implantable pacemakers. In: Cardiac Electrophysiology: From Cell to Bedside. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 26, 2016.
  7. What is a pacemaker? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/pace/. Accessed Jan. 27, 2016.
  8. What is the heart? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hhw#. Accessed Jan. 27, 2016.
  9. Pacemaker implantation. NHS Choices. http://www.nhs.uk/Pages/Preview.aspx?site=PacemakerImplantation&print=635895492679634634&JScript=0. Accessed Jan. 26, 2016.
  10. Hayes DL. Permanent cardiac pacing: Overview of devices and indications. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 26, 2016.
  11. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. About your pacemaker implantation. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2010.
  12. Gura MT. Considerations in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices at end of life. AACN Advanced Critical Care. 2015;26:356.
  13. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 13, 2016.
  14. Miller MA, et al. Leadless cardiac pacemakers: Back to the future. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2015;66:1179.
  15. Reddy VY, et al. Percutaneous implantation of an entirely intracardiac leadless pacemaker. The Lancet. 2015;37:1125.
  16. Mankad R (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 8, 2016.