Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

U.S. patients

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Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Arizona

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Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida

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Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minnesota

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Mayo Clinic's heart transplant doctors and surgeons use proven innovations to successfully treat people with congestive heart failure and other serious heart diseases. Their experience in using advanced technology, specialized procedures and an integrated approach focused on the patient makes Mayo Clinic a leader in transplant outcomes.

Experts in heart and lung surgery (cardiac and thoracic surgeons) perform more than 90 heart transplants a year at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. People turn to Mayo Clinic for help with a wide range of heart diseases. And some come to Mayo Clinic Transplant Center for its expertise in multiorgan transplants and a rare condition called amyloidosis. Each year, Mayo Clinic doctors see 1,600 people with this condition, some of whom may benefit from a heart transplant.

Mayo Clinic's experts focus on your needs, bringing to your situation the strength of their:

  • Experience. Mayo Clinic's heart transplant team is recognized nationally and internationally for its expertise in comprehensive specialty treatment for people with serious heart disease. Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States. Doctors trained in all types of transplantation have experience treating people with complex conditions who may need multiorgan transplants, including heart-lung, heart-liver, heart-kidney and heart-lung-liver transplants.
  • Teamwork. A multidisciplinary team of doctors and health care professionals provide you with comprehensive care and the most appropriate treatment. This team may include Mayo Clinic doctors trained in transplantation, heart and lung surgery (cardiac and thoracic surgeons), heart and blood vessel diseases (cardiologists), infectious diseases, mental health conditions (psychiatrists), and other areas. Doctors trained in treating children with heart conditions (pediatric cardiologists) evaluate and treat children at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota.

    An example of Mayo Clinic's unique multidisciplinary approach to teamwork occurred in 2016 when the heart transplant team at Mayo Clinic's Arizona campus successfully completed two heart transplants simultaneously. That meant two separate transplant teams were needed to procure the donor hearts, and two separate teams of surgeons and physician assistants were needed for the transplant surgeries. Both patients had been on a ventricular assist device that kept their hearts pumping until a matching heart would be available.

    The Transplant Center staff members at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota share the same high standards and a commitment to individualized care. They work together to evaluate and treat people who may need a heart transplant. So you could be evaluated at one location and undergo surgery at another, if it's in your best interest.

  • Specialized skills. Mayo Clinic cardiologists and heart transplant surgeons advance the science and clinical practice related to many aspects of heart transplant, including multiorgan transplants and novel use of immunosuppressive (anti-rejection) drugs to improve outcomes.

    People being evaluated for serious heart conditions receive individualized care and offered all appropriate treatment options. If it's right for you, your doctor will discuss bridges to transplant or alternatives to transplant, such as medical therapy and cardiac assist devices. For example, in 2010 a patient at Mayo Clinic's campus in Arizona was the first person in the United States to go home on a total artificial heart. This helped him cope while awaiting a donor heart.

  • Innovative research. Mayo Clinic scientists and doctors are committed to expanding and sharing knowledge that makes transplants safer and improves patients' lives. And they research techniques that help people avoid transplant altogether, such as the ventricular assist device.

    At Mayo Clinic, you may have access to ongoing clinical trials and new treatments.

    Every day the Transplant Research Center brings together surgeons, cardiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, experts in human cell therapy, and scientists from many other fields and institutions to collaborate. For example, Mayo Clinic is a leader in researching genetics and new treatments for congenital heart disease, including hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Read more about this work of the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

Mayo Clinic surgeons perform heart transplants at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Heart transplant in children is provided at Mayo Clinic's pediatric heart transplant program in Rochester, Minnesota. At Mayo Clinic's campus in Arizona, doctors trained in heart diseases (cardiologists) partner with Phoenix Children's Hospital to treat teenagers and young adults with congenital heart defects.

Services

Mayo Clinic heart doctors and surgeons work with a multidisciplinary team to ensure you get exactly the care you need. These experts treat people in many areas of heart transplantation, including those listed below. Not all services are available at each of Mayo Clinic's three campuses, in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Please confirm when you call for an appointment.

Mayo Clinic doctors trained in heart and blood vessel conditions (cardiologists), heart surgery (cardiac surgeons), and other specialists have extensive experience treating people with serious heart conditions caused by different diseases. Many people come to Mayo Clinic when their condition is complex or extremely unusual. You may come to Mayo Clinic on your own or with a referral from your doctor.

Doctors will work with you to determine the most appropriate treatment for you. Your treatment may include a heart transplant or other therapies, such as a ventricular assist device.

Find conditions treated by this department:

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

Find doctors and medical staff:

Arizona doctors by specialty

Heart transplant cardiologists

Heart transplant and mechanical assist device surgeons

Florida doctors by specialty

Heart transplant cardiologists

Heart transplant and mechanical assist device surgeons

Minnesota doctors by specialty

Heart transplant cardiologists

Pediatric heart transplant cardiologists

Heart transplant and mechanical assist device surgeons

Mayo Clinic heart transplant surgeons have performed hundreds of procedures using the most advanced technology since performing their first heart transplant more than 30 years ago. Our Transplant Center team members in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders and innovators in heart transplant, immunosuppressive (anti-rejection) medicine and cardiac assist devices that help people live better while waiting for a donor heart.

Mayo Clinic doctors and surgeons are experts in many areas of heart transplantation including:

Mayo Clinic heart transplant outcomes compare favorably with the national average. And independent patient experience surveys indicate that a high number of Mayo Clinic patients who are being cared for by the heart transplant team are very satisfied with their care and would recommend the practice to others.

Nationally ranked

Mayo Clinic campuses are nationally recognized for expertise in cardiology and cardiovascular surgery:

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Children's Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic is also recognized for high-quality cardiology and heart surgery subspecialty care, research, and education by a variety of national organizations:

  • Healthcare Colloquium. The Mayo Clinic Children's Center at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota has been certified by the Healthcare Colloquium as an Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute.
  • Top-ranked education program. The Internal Medicine Residency at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota is ranked among the top performing programs by U.S. News & World Report and Doximity. Heart specialists train in an internal medicine residency program before completing cardiology subspecialty training.
  • Extracorporeal Life Support Organization. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona and Minnesota have received awards as Centers of Excellence in life support from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's quality rankings.

The Village at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, offers low-cost housing for transplant patients and their caregivers.

The Gabriel House of Care in Jacksonville, Florida, offers low-cost housing for transplant patients and their caregivers.

The Gift of Life Transplant House in Rochester, Minnesota, offers low-cost housing for transplant patients and their caregivers.

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Mayo Clinic cardiologists, cardiac and thoracic surgeons, and other specialists develop heart transplant insights and innovations that make transplants safer and available to more people. And they pursue new strategies and technologies in pediatric heart failure and pediatric heart transplantation.

Mayo Clinic's team in Arizona pioneered use of cardiac mechanical assist devices, improving patients' quality of life while on the waiting list for a donor heart. They continue to study smaller models of ventricular assist devices (VADs) and total artificial hearts and how to improve the patient experience with these devices.

Mayo Clinic researchers also conduct laboratory studies, clinical trials and other research on every aspect of conditions related to heart transplants, such as:

  • Developing new drug regimens to improve outcomes. Mayo Clinic heart doctors (cardiologists) have shown possible benefits of a drug called sirolimus (Rapamune) to long-term survival after heart transplant. Sirolimus is a drug that keeps the body from rejecting the new heart by suppressing the body's immune response.
  • Assessing women's risks after heart transplant. Mayo doctors reported that women who have heart transplants are at higher risk of complications that affect long-term survival than are men.
  • Evaluating multiorgan treatment practices. Mayo Clinic doctors evaluated and shared insights from Mayo's experience with 27 combined heart-liver transplants, an uncommonly performed surgery. Their report highlights how this lifesaving surgery can help people with congenital or acquired heart disease.
  • Advancing care of people with amyloidosis. Mayo doctors shared their strategies for improving outcomes of people undergoing heart transplants due to cardiac amyloidosis and sarcoidosis.
  • Developing new stem cell therapies (regenerative medicine). Success in this work could help people with heart failure avoid transplant altogether.
  • Developing genomic blood tests to watch for early signs of rejection in transplant organs. The goal of this research is to improve long-term survival after transplant.
  • Developing new treatment options for children with congenital heart disease. Read more about the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

Mayo Clinic's scientists and doctors often collaborate with colleagues throughout the United States and internationally, sharing their medical advances to improve patient care everywhere.

You may have the opportunity to participate in clinical trials. Read more about heart transplant research in the Transplant Research Center and the Cardiovascular Research Center.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic authors on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of Mayo Clinic transplant patients.

Heart transplant costs and insurance information

Mayo Clinic has dedicated transplant financial services representatives and social workers who can assist you with insurance and financial questions regarding your transplant.

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. Many insurance companies require you to get preapproval authorization prior to transplant services.

Insurance information

Before your transplant, it's important that you work closely with your insurance company to understand your benefit plan. You'll be responsible for any of your transplant and medical care costs not covered by your insurance company.

You may want to ask your insurance company several questions regarding your transplant expenses, such as:

  • What is the specific coverage of my plan? What are my deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, lifetime maximum amount and annual maximum amounts for both medical care and transplant services?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period clause? If so, what is the time frame? Can this be waived?
  • Does my plan include pharmacy coverage? If so, will my plan cover my current medications and immunosuppressant medications?
  • Does my plan require any special approvals for evaluation or transplant? How long does the approval process take once submitted to insurance?
  • Does my plan cover my transportation and lodging expenses during my transplant care?
  • Does my current insurance require enrollment in Medicare when I become eligible?
  • Does my insurance follow Medicare Coordination of Benefits guidelines?
  • How will my current coverage change after I enroll in Medicare? Will my plan become a supplemental or secondary plan?

If your plan is a Medicare supplement, ask questions such as:

  • Does my plan follow Medicare guidelines?
  • Does my plan cover Medicare Part A and B deductible and coinsurance?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period? If so, what is the time frame?
  • Does my plan offer an option for Medicare Part D coverage?

Other expenses

Please plan for other expenses that may occur related to your transplant, which may include follow-up medical appointments, long-term medications, caregiver expenses, travel, parking, lodging and other expenses.

For international patients

Mayo Clinic has dedicated international patient account representatives who can assist you with questions regarding your costs and insurance. Read more about international financial services.

Case managers

Mayo Clinic financial staff will work closely with your case managers from your insurance company. Your case manager, who is assigned to you, is available to answer questions and calls related to your insurance costs.

Mayo Clinic heart transplant surgeons have performed hundreds of procedures since the heart transplant program began in 1988.

Mayo Clinic doctors' experience and integrated team approach result in transplant outcomes that compare favorably with national averages. Teams work with transplant recipients before, during and after surgery to ensure the greatest likelihood of superior results.

Volumes and statistics are maintained separately for the three Mayo Clinic locations. Taken together or separately, transplant patients at Mayo Clinic enjoy excellent results.

Volumes

Arizona

A total of 44 heart transplants were performed at Mayo Clinic in Arizona in 2017. More than 276 heart transplants have been completed since the program began in 2005.

Florida

A total of 23 heart transplants were performed at Mayo Clinic in Florida in 2017. More than 300 heart transplants and eight heart-lung transplants have been completed since the program began in 2001. Mayo surgeons have performed combined transplants, such as heart-kidney and heart-lung-liver transplants.

Minnesota

Mayo Clinic's outcomes for heart transplantation compare favorably with national norms. Doctors at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota have transplanted more than 650 adult and pediatric patients, including both isolated heart transplants and combined transplants such as heart-liver, heart-kidney and others. The program began in 1988.

Outcomes

Each of the links below connects to an external site, the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, which provides many metrics gathered from transplant programs across the United States.

Heart Transplant — Adult

Heart Transplant — Children

Heart/Lung Transplant — Adult

People with serious heart conditions leading to heart failure may be most appropriately treated with a heart transplant if other treatment options have been considered or tried. Heart failure may be caused by many medical conditions, including:

Your transplant team will evaluate you to determine whether a heart transplant may be safe and beneficial for you. Your comprehensive evaluation includes blood tests, imaging studies and other tests. Doctors will check you for other serious conditions, including chronic infections and cancer.

Most people who are evaluated are determined to be eligible for a heart transplant. Your doctors and transplant team will work with you to promote wellness, lower your risks and improve your outcome after heart transplant. A care team member will talk with you about the importance of taking your immunosuppressant (anti-rejection) medications to keep your body from rejecting your heart.

Sections

Feb. 06, 2018
References
  1. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. http://www.srtr.org/default.aspx. Accessed May 13, 2016.
  2. U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News Best Hospitals 2015-16. http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings. Accessed Feb. 22, 2016.
  3. Cook AJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 2, 2014.
  4. Heart transplant program to resume in fall of 1986. Mayovox. 1986:37;1.
  5. Mancini D. Indications and contraindications for cardiac transplantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 22, 2016.
  6. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Heart transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  7. Yip DS (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. June 20, 2016.
  8. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Your child's heart transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  9. Johnson JN (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. June 20, 2016.
  10. Vucicevic D, et al. Sirolimus based immunosuppression results in lower incidence of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders in heart transplant recipients. Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2015;34:s86.
  11. Kalya A, et al. Role of total artificial heart in the management of heart transplant rejection and retransplantation: Case report and review. Clinical Transplantation. 2013;27:e348.
  12. Shankar N, et al. LVAD implant as a bridge to heart transplantation is associated with allosensitization as measured by single antigen bead assay. Transplantation. 2013;96:324.
  13. Barbara DW, et al. The perioperative management of patients undergoing combined heart-liver transplantation. Transplantation. 2015;99:139.
  14. Burkhart HM, et al. Regenerative therapy for hypoplastic left heart syndrome: First report of intraoperative intramyocardial injection of autologous umbilical-cord blood-derived cells. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2015;149:e35. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002252231401602X. Accessed May 5, 2016.
  15. Pundi KN, et al. 40-year follow-up after the Fontan operation: Long-term outcomes of 1,052 patients. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2015;66:1700.
  16. Rosenbaum AN, et al. Current indications, strategies and outcomes with cardiac transplantation for cardiac amyloidosis and sarcoidosis. Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation. 2015;20:584.
  17. Grupper A, et al. Increased risk of antibody mediated rejection and subsequent allograft vasculopathy in women post cardiac transplantation. Journal of Women's Health. 2015;24:A-16.
  18. Rosenbaum AN, et al. Association between early cardiac rehabilitation and long-term survival in cardiac transplant recipients. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2016;91:149.
  19. Medical practice report: Heart transplant. Press Ganey. http://www.pressganey.com/. Accessed May 24, 2016.
  20. Khandhar SJ, et al. Optical coherence tomography for characterization of cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation. Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2013;32:596.
  21. Mayo Clinic Children's Center becomes first accredited pediatric heart failure institute in Minnesota and fourth in the nation (news release). http://www.evaluategroup.com/Universal/View.aspx?type=Story&id=458981. Accessed June 27, 2016.
  22. Doctors name America's top residency programs (news release). U.S. News & World Report. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/top-doctors/articles/2014/02/20/doctors-name-americas-top-residency-programs. Accessed June 27, 2016.
  23. Centers of excellence. Extracorporeal Life Support Organization. https://www.elso.org/Excellence/CentersofExcellence.aspx. Accessed June 27, 2016.
  24. Heilman RL (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. June 24, 2016.