Results

If the information gathered during your exercise stress test shows your heart function to be normal, you may not need any further tests.

However, if the results are normal and your symptoms continue to worsen, your doctor might recommend a nuclear stress test or another stress test that includes an echocardiogram before and after exercise or medications to increase blood flow to your heart. These tests are more accurate and provide more information about your heart function, but they are also more expensive.

If your stress test results suggest that you might have coronary artery disease or show an arrhythmia, your doctor will use the information to develop a treatment plan. You may need additional tests, such as a coronary angiogram.

If you had a stress test to help determine treatment for a heart condition, your doctor will use the results to plan or change your treatment.

Nov. 09, 2017
References
  1. What is stress testing? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/stress. Accessed Sept. 8, 2017.
  2. Yanowitz FG, et al. Exercise ECG testing: Performing the test and determining the ECG results. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. 8, 2017.
  3. Fletcher GF, et al. Exercise standards for testing and training. Circulation. 2013;128:873.
  4. Bonow RO, et al., eds. Exercise testing. In: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 11, 2017.
  5. Stress nuclear study. American College of Cardiology. https://www.cardiosmart.org/News-and-Events/2013/01/Video-Stress-Nuclear-Study. Accessed Sept. 11, 2017.
  6. Mankad R (expert opinion). Rochester, Minn. Sept. 14, 2017.