Epilepsy care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Mayo Clinic's world-renowned epilepsy teams include neurologists, neurosurgeons, imaging specialists (radiologists), mental health specialists (neuropsychologists) and other professionals who work together to provide exactly the care you need.

Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion — your care is discussed among the team, your test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and the most highly specialized epilepsy experts in the world are all working together for you.

What might take months to accomplish elsewhere can typically be done in only a matter of days at Mayo Clinic.

Early Diagnosis and Teamwork Cures Intractable Epilepsy

Advanced diagnosis & treatment

Mayo Clinic epilepsy care teams use advanced technology, including subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM), electroencephalography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other tests to accurately diagnose epilepsy. Each Mayo Clinic location offers inpatient video-EEG epilepsy monitoring.

With state-of-the-art research and laboratory facilities, Mayo Clinic experts are constantly seeking new medical knowledge and innovations like this for people with epilepsy. Today's research teams are studying potential treatments, including new medications, implantable brain stimulation devices and new surgical options. A variety of clinical trials and other clinical studies may be available to you at Mayo Clinic.

Nationally recognized expertise

The National Association of Epilepsy Centers (NAEC) rates all three Mayo Clinic campuses as Level 4 Epilepsy Centers, providing the highest-level of diagnosis and treatment options for people with epilepsy.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks #1 for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery, and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., is ranked high performing for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery.

The Mayo Clinic experience and patient stories

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

  1. Saving Grace: Finding Hope for a Seizure-Free Future

    After suffering her first epileptic seizure at just 10 days of age, Grace Chan required six separate brain surgeries as surgeons worked to remove the harmful tissue that was causing her seizures. Ten days after giving birth, Christina Chen, M.D., was feeding her newborn daughter, Grace, when the young child's arms and head suddenly began [...]

  2. Racing Ahead to a New Career After a Brain Injury

    Just four months after being in a coma, Mike Short was crawling through tunnels, jumping over fiery logs, and scaling walls as part of a 5K race known as a "rugged maniac." The Georgia native owes his ability to participate in the race to the neurocritical care team at Mayo Clinic that helped him recover [...]

  3. Novel Approach to Epilepsy Surgery Allows a Young Woman to Enjoy Life Again

    Five weeks before she was born, Marissa B. had a stroke in utero. When her mother went into labor, Marissa had another stroke. Diagnosed with epilepsy at birth, Marissa spent her first month of life in the neonatal intensive care unit. ?When she was six months old, they did a brain MRI,? Marissa?s mom, Lisa, [...]

  4. After 20 Years of Seizures, Erica Laney Enjoys Life Following Epilepsy Surgery

    For much of her adolescent and adult life, Erica Laney, 31, had frequent petit mal seizures. Less often, she had grand mal seizures that led to loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions. The cause of the seizures was abnormal electrical activity throughout her brain. ?The seizures started when I was 11 years old. I [...]

  5. Changing Minds While Learning to Live With Epilepsy

    The first time Tehya Mrotek had a seizure during class, she had just begun high school. Most of the faculty and staff at Stewartville High School didn?t know how to respond to Tehya?s condition. The school nurse recognized what had happened, however. The nurse explained it to Tehya when she regained consciousness from her tonic-clonic [...]

  6. Surgery to Get Rid of Seizures Gives Brad Lewis New Freedom

    For 14 years, Brad Lewis never knew quite what to expect when he woke up in the morning. A rare genetic disorder, tuberous sclerosis, caused a variety of health problems. But the one that disrupted his life the most was epilepsy. At one point, Brad was having as many as 80 seizures a day. ?Seizures [...]

  7. Stopping the Seizures

    After brain surgery at Mayo Clinic, Xander Torres is a healthy, happy kid "My hand is wiggly." When 4-year-old Xander Torres said these words to his mother, Sarah, she had no idea the long journey they would begin. "To be honest, I didn't think much about it at first," she says. Several weeks went by [...]

  8. Ali is seizure free and still dancing

    When Ali Nowotny was just 15, she began to“blank out.” It was summer of 2006, and she was working as a waitress in her hometown of Rapid City, S.D. The episodes occurred about once a month, and left her “spaced out” for several minutes, slurred her speech and gave her headaches. Ali shrugged them off. [...]

Expertise and rankings

Mayo Clinic's epilepsy experts provide comprehensive care for more than 7,000 adults and children with epilepsy each year.

  • Teamwork. Mayo Clinic neurologists, neurosurgeons, imaging specialists (radiologists), mental health specialists (neuropsychologists) and others work together to diagnose and treat adults and children with epilepsy.
  • Diagnostic tools. Mayo Clinic doctors use advanced technology, including subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM), electroencephalography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other tests to accurately diagnose epilepsy. Each Mayo Clinic location offers an inpatient video-EEG epilepsy monitoring unit.
  • The latest techniques and technology. Mayo Clinic doctors have expertise treating epilepsy with medications, vagus nerve stimulation, surgery, awake brain surgery, ketogenic diet and other options. Mayo Clinic surgeons use computer-assisted brain surgery to precisely operate in your brain.
  • Nationally recognized expertise. The National Association of Epilepsy Centers (NAEC) rates all three Mayo Clinic campuses as Level 4 Epilepsy Centers, providing the highest-level of diagnosis and treatment options for people with epilepsy.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's neurosurgery and neurology departments' expertise and rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Aug. 12, 2017
References
  1. Seizures and epilepsy: Hope through research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/epilepsy/detail_epilepsy.htm. Accessed Sept. 25, 2014.
  2. Schachter SC. Evaluation of the first seizure in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014.
  3. Is an emergency room visit needed? Epilepsy Foundation. http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/aboutepilepsy/firstaid/is-an-emergency-room-visit-needed.cfm. Accessed Jan. 28, 2013.
  4. Injuries from seizures. Epilepsy Foundation. http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/aboutepilepsy/healthrisks/injuriesfromseizures.cfm. Accessed Jan. 28, 2013.
  5. Fact sheet on seizure-related causes of death and preventative measures. Epilepsy Foundation. http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/resources/newsroom/pressreleases/Fact-Sheet-on-Seizure-Related-Causes-of-Death-and-Preventative-Measures.cfm. Accessed Jan. 28, 2013.
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  11. Schachter SC. Overview of the management of epilepsy in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014.
  12. Wetjen NM, et al. Subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography coregistered to magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the need for repeated epilepsy surgery. Journal of Neurosurgery. 2006;105:71.
  13. Noe KH. Seizures: Diagnosis and management in the outpatient setting. Seminars in Neurology. 2011;31:54.
  14. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Surgical treatment for seizures. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2004.
  15. O'Brien TJ, et al. Subtraction SPECT co-registered to MRI improves postictal SPECT localization of seizure foci. Neurology. 1999;52:137.
  16. Lyons MK. Deep brain stimulation: Current and future clinical applications. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2011;86:662.
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  21. First aid. Epilepsy Foundation. http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/aboutepilepsy/firstaid/index.cfm. Accessed Jan. 31, 2013.
  22. Finding employment. Epilepsy Foundation. http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/livingwithepilepsy/employmenttopics/findingemployment.cfm. Accessed Feb. 4, 2013.
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  24. Worrell GA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 29, 2013.
  25. Willie, J. et al. Real-time magnetic resonance-guided stereotactic laser amygdalohippocampotomy for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Neurosurgery. 2014;74:58.
  26. Curing the epilepsies: The promise of research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/epilepsy/epilepsy_research.htm#Section2_2 Accessed Sept. 26, 2014.
  27. Chatman M, et al. Stereotactic-guided laser ablation of epileptogenic abnormalities in intractable focal epilepsy: Preliminary results. Neurology. 2013;80:P04.196. http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/80/1_MeetingAbstracts/P04.196. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014.
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