Liver cancer care at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic experts have the knowledge, experience and resources to provide you with exactly the care you need.

Your Mayo Clinic care team

At Mayo Clinic, experts in oncology, hepatology, surgery, radiology, pathology and transplant work together to form a team of specialists to provide whole-person care for those with liver cancer. Pediatric experts provide care for children with liver cancer. Other professionals are included as needed.

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

Mayo Clinic equips its doctors with the latest technology and specialized techniques to improve care. For instance, Mayo Clinic radiologists have access to advanced liver imaging, including magnetic resonance elastography, and Mayo Clinic surgeons are highly experienced in minimally invasive surgery.

Mayo Clinic doctors will work with you to review all of your treatment options and choose the treatment that best suits your needs and goals.

The range of treatments offered to people with liver cancer includes surgery, such as liver transplant, and ablative therapies, such as radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation. Other treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy and biological therapy.

Nationally recognized expertise

Liver cancer is not a common cancer in the United States. Mayo Clinic doctors have experience treating many cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and other rarer types of liver cancer.

Each year, Mayo Clinic doctors care for more than 1,200 people with primary liver cancer.

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center meets strict standards for a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, which recognizes scientific excellence and a multidisciplinary approach to cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

The Mayo Clinic experience and patient stories

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

Expertise and rankings

Mayo Clinic doctors have the experience and resources to provide expert, whole-person care to those with liver cancer.

Liver cancer is not a common cancer in the United States. Mayo Clinic doctors have experience treating many cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and other rarer types of liver cancer.

Each year, Mayo Clinic doctors care for more than 1,200 people with primary liver cancer.

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center meets strict standards for a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, which recognizes scientific excellence and a multidisciplinary approach to cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for cancer by U.S. News & World Report.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Aug. 19, 2017
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Hepatocellular carcinoma. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  2. Feldman M, et al. Hepatic tumors and cysts. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  3. Bruix J, et al. Liver cancer: Approaching a personalized care. Journal of Hepatology. 2015;62:S144.
  4. Adult primary liver cancer treatment (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/types/liver/patient/adult-liver-treatment-pdq. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  5. Hepatobiliary cancers. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  6. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma: An update. Alexandria, Va.: American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. http://www.aasld.org/publications/practice-guidelines-0. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  7. Hepatitis B FAQs for the public. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/bfaq.htm. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  8. Hepatitis C FAQs for the public. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/cfaq.htm. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  9. Cirrhosis. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/liver-disease/cirrhosis/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  10. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  11. Adult cancer pain. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  12. Cook AJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 15, 2016.