Departments and specialties

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

Doctors who perform this procedure

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Displaying 1-10 out of 31 doctors available

  1. Staci E. Beamer, M.D.

    Staci E. Beamer, M.D.

    1. Cardiothoracic Surgeon
    1. Phoenix, Arizona
    Areas of focus:

    Chest surgery, Heart care, Heart transplant, Lung transplant, Esophagitis, Lung cancer more

    see full list in profile
  2. Barry A. Boilson, M.D.

    Barry A. Boilson, M.D.

    1. Cardiologist
    2. Family Physician
    1. Rochester, Minnesota
    Areas of focus:

    Heart transplant, Left ventricular assist device implantation, Heart arrhythmias, Heart failure more

    see full list in profile
  3. Richard C. Daly, M.D.

    Richard C. Daly, M.D.

    1. Cardiovascular Surgeon
    1. Rochester, Minnesota
    Areas of focus:

    Heart transplant, Lung transplant, Mitral valve repair and replacement, Robotic heart surgery, Mitral valve disease more

    see full list in profile
  4. Joseph A. Dearani, M.D.

    Joseph A. Dearani, M.D.

    1. Cardiovascular Surgeon
    1. Rochester, Minnesota
    Areas of focus:

    Aortic valve repair and replacement, Congenital heart disease surgery, Heart transplant, Heart valve repair, Minimally invasive heart surgery, Mitral valve repair and replacement, Neonatal and pediatric heart surgery, Pulmonary valve repair and replacement, Robotic heart surgery, Septal myectomy, Tricuspid valve repair and replacement, Valve-sparing aortic root replacement, Congenital heart disease, Heart arrhythmias, Heart failure, Heart valve disease more

    see full list in profile
  5. Shannon M. Dunlay, M.D., M.S.

    Shannon M. Dunlay, M.D., M.S.

    1. Cardiologist
    2. Echocardiographer
    1. Rochester, Minnesota
    Areas of focus:

    Heart transplant, Mechanical circulatory support device implantation, Heart failure more

    see full list in profile
  6. Brooks S. Edwards, M.D.

    Brooks S. Edwards, M.D.

    1. Cardiologist
    2. Internist
    1. Rochester, Minnesota
    Areas of focus:

    Heart transplant, Congestive heart failure, High blood pressure, Pulmonary hypertension more

    see full list in profile
  7. Magdy M. El-Sayed Ahmed, M.B., B.Ch., M.D., M.S.

    Magdy M. El-Sayed Ahmed, M.B., B.Ch., M.D., M.S.

    1. Jacksonville, Florida
    Areas of focus:

    Coronary bypass surgery, Heart transplant, Heart valve surgery, Lung transplant, Mechanical circulatory support device implantation, Robotic surgery, Coronary artery disease, Heart failure, Heart valve disease more

    see full list in profile
  8. Robert P. Frantz, M.D.

    Robert P. Frantz, M.D.

    1. Cardiologist
    2. Internist
    1. Rochester, Minnesota
    Areas of focus:

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy, Heart transplant, Left ventricular assist device implantation, Heart failure, Pulmonary hypertension more

    see full list in profile
  9. Brian W. Hardaway, M.D.

    Brian W. Hardaway, M.D.

    1. Cardiologist
    1. Phoenix, Arizona
    Areas of focus:

    Heart transplant, Mechanical circulatory support device implantation, Heart failure more

    see full list in profile
  10. Samuel Jacob, M.D.

    Samuel Jacob, M.D.

    1. Cardiothoracic Surgeon
    1. Jacksonville, Florida
    Areas of focus:

    Heart transplant, Lung transplant, Mechanical circulatory support device implantation, Organ recovery surgery, Heart failure, Respiratory failure more

    see full list in profile
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Research

Mayo Clinic cardiologists, cardiac and thoracic surgeons, and other specialists research heart transplant and other treatments for heart failure. You may have the opportunity to participate in clinical trials. Read more about research in the Transplant Center and the Cardiovascular Research Center.

Areas of research include:

  • Stem cell therapy in cardiac regeneration research
  • Genetics and potential treatments for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare congenital heart defect
  • New or improved surgical procedures
  • New immunosuppressant medications
  • Outcomes after heart transplants
  • Ventricular assist devices
  • Alternative therapies for people who may not need heart transplants
  • Transplanting living organs from one species to another (xenotransplantation)
  • Gene therapy

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic authors on heart transplant on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Research Profiles

Heart transplant care at Mayo Clinic

March 23, 2018
References
  1. What is a heart transplant? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/ht. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  2. Mancini D. Indications and contraindications for cardiac transplantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  3. Colvin M, et al. OPTN/SRTR annual data report 2014: Heart. American Journal of Transplantation. 2016;16:115.
  4. What is a ventricular assist device? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/vad. Accessed April 7, 2016.
  5. What is a total artificial heart? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/tah. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  6. Flynn B, et al. Heart and lung transplantation. Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology. 2014;27:153.
  7. Goldman L, et al., eds. Cardiac transplantation. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 7, 2016.
  8. Pham MX. Prognosis after cardiac transplantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  9. Pham MX. Induction and maintenance of immunosuppressive therapy in cardiac transplantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  10. Pina IL. Rehabilitation after cardiac transplantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  11. McKenna WJ. Treatment of amyloid cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 1, 2016.
  12. What are the risks of heart surgery? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hs/risks. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  13. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Heart transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  14. Partnering with your transplant team: The patient's guide to transplantation. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/learn/patient-education/. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  15. What every patient needs to know. United Network for Organ Sharing. http://www.transplantliving.org/community/patient-resources/publications/. Accessed April 13, 2016.
  16. Diet and exercise. United Network for Organ Sharing: Transplant living. http://www.transplantliving.org/after-the-transplant/staying-healthy/diet-and-exercise/. Accessed April 13, 2016.
  17. Eisen HJ. Prevention and treatment of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 13, 2016.
  18. Topilsky Y, et al. Sirolimus as primary immunosuppression attenuates allograft vasculopathy with improved late survival and decreased cardiac events after cardiac transplantation. Circulation. 2012;125:708.
  19. Transplant gives recipient chance to re-establish priorities. Mayovox. August 1988;39:1.
  20. Heart transplant program to resume in fall of 1986. Mayovox. January 1986;37:1.
  21. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 8, 2016.
  22. Matsuo Y, et al. Attenuation of cardiac allograft vasculopathy by sirolimus: Relationship to time interval after heart transplantation. The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2013;32:784.
  23. Gertz MA, et al. Pathophysiology and treatment of cardiac amyloidosis. Nature Reviews Cardiology. 2015;12:91.
  24. Williams BA, et al. Heart failure and heart rhythm disorders. In: Current Diagnosis & Treatment: Geriatrics. 2nd ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed April 21, 2016.
  25. Guddetti RR, et al. Clinical implications of intracoronary imaging in cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging. 2015;8:e002636.
  26. Yancy CW, et al. 2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of heart failure: A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2013;62: e147.
  27. Yip DS (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. May 24, 2016.
  28. Medical practice report: Heart transplant. Press Ganey. http://www.pressganey.com/. Accessed May 24, 2016.
  29. Lund LH, et al. The Registry of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation: Thirty-second official adult heart transplantation report — 2015; focus theme: Early graft failure. The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2015;34:1244.