Diagnosis

Spinal AVM consultation at Mayo Clinic Spinal AVM consultation at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic’s AVM care team has the experience and knowledge to make accurate diagnoses and recommend the best treatment plan for you.

Spinal arteriovenous malformations can be difficult to diagnose because signs and symptoms are similar to those of other spinal conditions, such as spinal dural arteriovenous fistula, spinal stenosis, multiple sclerosis or a spinal cord tumor.

Your doctor will likely recommend tests to help rule out other causes of your symptoms, including:

  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create detailed images of your spinal cord. A spinal MRI can identify a mass resulting from abnormally connected blood vessels associated with AVM.
  • Angiography, which is usually needed to determine the location and characteristics of the blood vessels involved in the AVM.

    In an angiography, a thin tube (catheter) is inserted into an artery in your groin and guided to your spinal cord. Dye is injected into blood vessels in your spinal cord to make them visible under X-ray imaging.

Treatment

Spinal AVM surgery at Mayo Clinic Spinal AVM surgery at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic neurosurgeons use the latest tools and techniques to treat spinal AVM.

Treatment for spinal AVM may involve a combination of approaches to lessen symptoms as well as reduce the risk of potential complications. The choice of treatment will depend on the size, location and blood flow of your spinal AVM, your neurological exam, and your overall health.

The goal of spinal AVM treatment is to reduce the risk of hemorrhage and stop or prevent the progression of disability and other symptoms.

Medication

Pain-relieving medications may be used to reduce symptoms such as back pain and stiffness, but most spinal AVMs will eventually require surgery.

Endovascular embolization

Endovascular embolization is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to reduce the risk of hemorrhage and other complications associated with spinal AVMs.

In endovascular embolization, a catheter is inserted into an artery in your leg and threaded to an artery in your spinal cord that is feeding your AVM. Small particles of a glue-like substance are injected to block the artery and reduce blood flow into the AVM.

Endovascular embolization is often used in combination with spinal AVM surgery. Your doctor may recommend endovascular embolization before surgery to reduce the risk of bleeding during surgery or to reduce the size of the AVM so that surgery is more successful.

Surgery

Surgery is usually needed to remove a spinal AVM from the surrounding tissue.

Your doctor will discuss the benefits and risks of surgery to remove your AVM. The close proximity of the AVM to the spinal cord means spinal AVM surgery is a technically difficult and complex procedure that should be performed by an experienced neurosurgeon.

Spinal AVM surgery is usually performed in combination with endovascular embolization.

Preparing for your appointment

You may be referred to a doctor who specializes in disorders of the brain and nervous system (neurologist).

What you can do

  • Write down your symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason why you scheduled the appointment.
  • Make a list of all your medications, vitamins and supplements.
  • Write down your key medical information, including other conditions.
  • Write down key personal information, including any recent changes or stressors in your life.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • What treatments are available, and what types of side effects can I expect?
  • I have other health conditions. How can I best manage these conditions together?
  • Should I restrict my activities?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may make time to go over points you want to discuss in more detail. You may be asked:

  • Have you experienced problems with walking or had weakness in your legs?
  • Have you had numbness, tingling or pain in your legs?
  • Have you had headaches or back pain?
  • When did you begin experiencing these symptoms? Have they been continuous or occasional?
  • Do your symptoms worsen when you exercise?

Spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) care at Mayo Clinic

Aug. 16, 2017
References
  1. Rubin MN, et al. Vascular diseases of the spinal cord. Neurologic Clinics. 2013;31:153.
  2. Eisen A. Disorders affecting the spinal cord. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 4, 2017.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Cerebral vascular malformations. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  4. Arteriovenous malformations and other vascular lesions of the central nervous system fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. https://catalog.ninds.nih.gov/ninds/product/Arteriovenous-Malformations-and-Other-Vascular-Lesions-of-the-Central-Nervous-System/15-4854. Accessed Jan. 6, 2017.
  5. Longo DL, et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed March 27, 2017.
  6. Chaudhary N, et al. Endovascular treatment of adult spinal arteriovenous lesions. Neuroimaging Clinics of North America. 2013;23:729.
  7. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 5, 2017.
  8. Lanzino G, et al. Onyx embolization of extradural spinal arteriovenous malformations with intradural venous drainage. Neurosurgery. 2012;70:329.
  9. Demaerschalk BM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. Jan. 30, 2017.
  10. Zimmerman, RS (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. March 27, 2017.