Coping and support

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Many people with alcohol problems and their family members find that participating in support groups is an essential part of coping with the disease, preventing or dealing with relapses, and staying sober. Your doctor or counselor can suggest a support group. These groups are also often listed on the Web and sometimes in the phone book.

Here are a few examples:

  • Alcoholics Anonymous. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a self-help group of people recovering from alcoholism that offers a sober peer group built around 12 steps as an effective model for achieving total abstinence.
  • Women for Sobriety. Women for Sobriety is a nonprofit organization offering a self-help group program for women who want to overcome alcoholism and other addictions. It focuses on developing coping skills related to emotional and spiritual growth, self-esteem and a healthy lifestyle.
  • Al-Anon and Alateen. Al-Anon is designed for people who are affected by someone else's alcoholism. Alateen groups are available for teenage children of those with alcoholism. In sharing their stories, family members gain a greater understanding of how the disease affects the entire family.

July 25, 2015