Diagnosis

Your doctor will likely review your signs and symptoms and perform a physical examination. A number of diagnostic tests may help your doctor determine the cause of your discomfort and rule out other disorders causing similar symptoms. These may include:

  • Blood tests. Blood tests may help rule out other diseases that can cause signs and symptoms similar to those of nonulcer stomach pain.
  • Tests for a bacterium. Your doctor may recommend a test to look for a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) that can cause stomach problems. H. pylori testing may use your blood, stool or breath.
  • Using a scope to examine your digestive system. A thin, flexible, lighted instrument (endoscope) is passed down your throat so that your doctor can view your esophagus, stomach and the first part of your small intestine (duodenum). This will also allow the doctor to collect small pieces of tissue from your duodenum to look for inflammation.

Treatment

Nonulcer stomach pain that is long lasting and isn't controlled by lifestyle changes may require treatment. What treatment you receive depends on your signs and symptoms. Treatment may combine medications with behavior therapy.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes to help you control your nonulcer stomach pain.

Alternative medicine

People with nonulcer stomach pain often turn to complementary and alternative medicine to help them cope. No complementary or alternative treatments are proved to cure nonulcer stomach pain. But when used along with your doctor's care, complementary and alternative treatments may provide relief from your signs and symptoms.

If you're interested in complementary and alternative treatments, talk to your doctor about:

  • Herbal supplements. Herbal remedies that may be of some benefit for nonulcer stomach pain include a combination of angelica, peppermint leaf, clown’s mustard plant, German chamomile, caraway, licorice, milk thistle, celandine and lemon balm. These supplements may relieve some of the symptoms of nonulcer stomach pain, such as fullness and gastrointestinal spasms.

    Artichoke leaf extract may reduce other symptoms of nonulcer stomach pain, including vomiting, nausea and abdominal pain.

  • Relaxation techniques. Activities that help you relax may help you control and cope with your signs and symptoms. Consider trying meditation, yoga or other activities that may help reduce your stress levels.

Preparing for your appointment

Make an appointment with your family doctor or a general practitioner if you have signs or symptoms that worry you. If nonulcer stomach pain is suspected, your doctor may refer you to a specialist in digestive diseases (gastroenterologist).

Nonulcer stomach pain care at Mayo Clinic

Feb. 06, 2015
References
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