Outcomes & ratings

How is Mayo Clinic’s care model designed to meet my personal needs?

Our practice provides whole-person care that takes into account and addresses all of your needs. Our multidisciplinary care brings together experts who work together to determine the best course and sequence of therapy according to your individual needs.

Paula Hill: My name is Paula Hill. I have lived here in the valley for over 30 years. I'm the mother of four grown children and the wife of a retired firefighter.

I had been for a routine mammogram and the results came back normal. Shortly following that I had my annual exam with my regular GYN, who did a breast exam, and found a lump. I then got a phone call a few days later saying that it was, in fact, cancer and that I should start investigating treatment. But I was also familiar with Mayo Clinic because my father had been treated about five years previous with some very cutting edge technology for a heart condition. So I included Mayo in my search for treatment knowing that they had probably the best and most advanced team available.

Barbara Pockaj, M.D., Surgical Oncologist, Mayo Clinic: I was the first one that Paula saw when she came to Mayo Clinic and that's not uncommon in patients who are newly diagnosed with breast cancer, they come and meet with the surgeon first.

Paula Hill: When my husband and I got home that day we knew that Mayo was really where we wanted to be. The treatment plan that was laid out for me was six months of chemotherapy, followed by surgery, followed by 20 rounds of radiation, and then one year of Herceptin treatments, but what I liked about the plan was that surgery wasn't first and that they were taking an opportunity to shrink the tumor so that there was a very good chance I could have just a lumpectomy versus a full mastectomy and that really appealed to me.

Barbara Pockaj, M.D.: What I told Paula she had good news, bad news. Bad news is she had the breast cancer and it was an aggressive breast cancer. The good news is these aggressive breast cancers really respond to treatment.

Donald Northfelt, M.D. Associate Medical Director, Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic: After we had reviewed her case we recognized that she was qualified to participate in a clinical trial that we had going on at the time. This trial is called the I-SPY 2 trial and it was a study of various treatment options for locally advanced breast cancer. The study included testing of new drugs specifically designed to work against the HER2 protein and in that way to favorably treat her cancer.

Paula Hill: One of the things we wanted to know was how far advanced the trial was and how much success they'd had with the drug. So we learned that the trial was in the later phases. That it had already been used on human beings. I wasn't the first, and that all of the regular protocol treatment for breast cancer, my particular breast cancer, would also be included in addition to the trial drug, so I would not miss out on any treatment that I would normally get. This would be in addition to, in hopes that it would shrink the tumor even further.

Barbara Pockaj, M.D.: Paula did go on to the I-SPY trial and we had really remarkable response. She had a big tumor, with lymph nodes positive, and after it was done we had the imaging and nothing showed up on imaging. That doesn't always mean we don't find anything at surgery, but it means it shrunk a lot and we have really all the options open.

Donald Northfelt, M.D.: This is why we come to work every day. We hope to see these kinds of outcomes for our patients. We're even more grateful when we see it happen in the context of a clinical trial. In the clinical trial new ideas are being applied to the treatment of cancer and we are always so hopeful that those are going to lead to better outcomes for our patients.

Paula Hill: I actually resumed many, well, I've resumed my whole life, and I have a completely different outlook on life now. I think I'm much happier, less picky, not so much a perfectionist, and I really just enjoy everything that comes my way.

Leaders in Team-Based Care

Our practice provides whole-person care that takes into account and addresses all of your needs. Our multidisciplinary care brings together experts who work together to determine the best course and sequence of therapy according to your individual needs.

Our High Risk Breast Clinic also provides multidisciplinary care to patients with an increased risk of breast cancer due to familial or breast biopsy-based risk factors. Whether you are at high risk of breast cancer or whether your cancer is early stage or complex and late stage, your multidisciplinary care team carefully weighs all your treatment options to create a plan that's personalized for you.

U.S. News & World Report Top Hospital Rankings, 2020-2021

Ranked #1 Hospital Nationwide

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota

Ranked #1 Hospital in Arizona

Mayo Clinic in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona

Ranked #1 Hospital in Florida

Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida

Outcomes & ratings

Leaders in Team-Based Care

Our practice provides whole-person care that takes into account all of your needs. Our multidisciplinary care brings together experts who work together to determine the best course and sequence of therapy according to your individual needs.

Our High Risk Breast Clinic also provides multidisciplinary care to patients with an increased risk of breast cancer due to familial or breast biopsy-based risk factors. Whether you are at high risk of breast cancer or whether your cancer is early stage or complex and late stage, your multidisciplinary care team carefully weighs all your treatment options to create a plan that's personalized for you.

U.S. News & World Report Top Hospital Rankings, 2021-2022

  • Ranked #1 Hospital Nationwide: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota
  • Ranked #1 Hospital in Arizona: Mayo Clinic in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona
  • Ranked #1 Hospital in Florida: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida

Expertise and experience

Physicians at Mayo Clinic treat many patients like you every year. In a typical year, we provide some first course treatment or decision-making for approximately 1,700 patients with breast cancer across our three major centers. In 2019, our skilled surgeons performed over 990 lumpectomies and over 675 mastectomies to treat women with breast cancer, and we performed immediate breast reconstruction (reconstruction at the same time as the mastectomy) in more than 425 patients.* This same year, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for breast cancer, and over 1,290 patients received chemotherapy for breast cancer.† Our High Risk Breast Clinic has over 3,400 visits annually.‡ Thousands more patients with breast cancer receive care of any kind at Mayo Clinic.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, annually:

  • 1,700+ patients provided first course treatment or decision-making
  • 990+ lumpectomies
  • 675+ mastectomies
  • 425+ patients receiving immediate breast reconstruction
  • 900+ patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer
  • 1,290+ patients treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer

*Surgical procedures performed in 2019 at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida

†Radiotherapy and chemotherapy performed in 2019 at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida

‡High Risk Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and Jacksonville, Florida

Minimal disruption to your life

At Mayo Clinic we strive to provide world-class care with minimal disruption to your life.

Surgical procedure same-day discharge percentages
Procedure Same-day discharge

Surgical procedures performed from March 2020 to August 2020 at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida

IBR = Immediate breast reconstruction

Lumpectomy 95.7%
Mastectomy, no IBR 66.4%
Mastectomy, IBR 34.8%
Radiation therapy completion
Therapy type Completed in 5 days or less
Radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer 60.0%

Results that show in patient ratings

Patient satisfaction with Mayo Clinic is very high. Among patients who underwent outpatient lumpectomy or mastectomy for breast cancer and responded to a survey about their visit for surgery, 99% of patients gave Mayo Clinic the top or next-to-top rating for overall satisfaction with care, confidence in their physician and many other categories. Patients also rate their office visits with high satisfaction. Among patients who underwent first course treatment for breast cancer and responded to a survey about an office visit, 99% gave Mayo Clinic the top or next-to-top overall rating of care. Satisfaction is especially high among patients with metastatic cancer, where 100% of patients with metastatic cancer who responded to a survey gave Mayo Clinic the top or next-to-top overall rating of care for their office visits for breast cancer at Mayo Clinic.

Patient experience with lumpectomy and mastectomy§
Good or very good (top two ratings)
Category Rating

Note: Patient experience surveys administered by Press Ganey

§Patients who underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, in 2019

Overall rating of care received during your visit 99.7%
Likelihood of recommending to others 98.8%
Your confidence in the skill of the physician 99.7%
Staff effort to include you in decisions about your treatment 99.1%
Staff's sensitivity and responsiveness to your special/individual needs 99.1%
Patient experience with office visits for breast cancer**
Good or very good (top two ratings)
Category Rating

Note: Patient experience surveys administered by Press Ganey

**Patients who received first course treatment or a decision not to treat with an office visit for breast cancer at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, in 2017

Overall rating of care received during your visit 99.5%
Likelihood of recommending to others 99.5%
Your confidence in the care provider 99.1%
Care provider's efforts to include you in decisions about your treatment 99.0%
Our sensitivity to your needs 98.4%
Patient experience with office visits among patients with metastatic breast cancer††
Good or very good (top two ratings)
Category Rating

Note: Patient experience surveys administered by Press Ganey

††Patients with metastatic breast cancer with an office visit for breast cancer at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, in 2017

Overall rating of care received during your visit 100%
Likelihood of recommending to others 100%
Your confidence in the care provider 93.3%
Care provider's efforts to include you in decisions about your treatment 93.3%
Our sensitivity to your needs 96.6%

World-class breast cancer care

In a typical year, patients from over 20 countries and over 45 U.S. states and territories undergo radiation, surgery, or receive other first course treatment or decision-making for breast cancer care at Mayo Clinic.‡‡ We offer a full range of treatment options, including surgery, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, radiation therapy, targeted drug therapy and clinical trials across the care journey. World-class expertise, care processes, imaging techniques and interpretation of data in clinical decision-making drive results in key outcomes at Mayo Clinic. We strive to deliver the best possible outcomes for each individual patient.

  • Genetic counseling
  • World-class imaging
  • Breast pathologists
  • Surgery
  • Reconstruction
  • Chemotherapy
  • Hormone therapy
  • Radiation therapy
  • Targeted drug therapy
  • Lymphedema prevention and management
  • Clinical trials

‡‡Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, in 2019

Advanced screening technologies and diagnostic accuracy

At Mayo Clinic, our breast imaging experts collaborate across all Mayo Clinic locations.

Imaging and exams across all Mayo Clinic sites in 2019:

  • 117,000+ screening mammography exams
  • 680+ contrast-enhanced screening mammography exams
  • 33,000+ diagnostic mammography exams
  • 19,000+ breast ultrasound exams
  • 4,800+ breast MRI exams
  • 2,900+ breast MBI exams
  • 5,900+ image-guided needle biopsies
Sources:
  1. Hruska CB, et al. Diagnostic workup and costs of a single supplemental molecular breast imaging screen of mammographically dense breasts. American Journal of Roentgenology. 2015; doi:10.2214/AJR.14.13306.
  2. Hruska CB. Molecular breast imaging for screening in dense breasts: State of the art and future directions. American Journal of Roentgenology. 2017; doi:10.2214/AJR.16.17131.

At Mayo Clinic, you have access to the latest technology and techniques to diagnose and treat breast cancer. Imaging is done by radiologists who specialize in breast imaging, including many who've completed additional, advanced training programs. Our technology includes molecular breast imaging (MBI), digital mammography, 3D mammography (tomosynthesis) and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We are studying new technology including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and contrastenhanced digital mammography. In women with dense breast tissue, screening with MBI detected three times as many cancers as mammography. As Mayo Clinic researchers have published, MBI is a good option for women seeking additional screening because of high breast density, but who do not meet the high-risk criteria to qualify for an MRI. At Mayo Clinic we have specialty testing for biomarkers.

Access to clinical trials

Mayo Clinic provided patients access to over 40 interventional treatment trials in 2019, and over the last 10 years patients with metastatic cancer have had access to 55 trials. Many of these trials are born out of discoveries made by Mayo Clinic scientists. Mayo Clinic is recognized as one of the premier breast cancer research institutes in the U.S. Mayo Clinic is a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer center, and breast cancer research is conducted within the Women's Cancer Program as well as the NCI-sponsored Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE). We focus our research and practice to meet the needs of all populations. Enrollment in our cancer-related interventional trials reflects the diversity of the cancer population in our surrounding areas.

Focus on cosmetic outcome

Our experts are using innovative techniques (oncoplastic surgery) that optimize the appearance of your breast and maintain excellent cancer control, such as combining lumpectomy with a breast lift or breast reduction. In addition, we perform nipple-sparing mastectomy to improve the appearance of the reconstructed breast and offer muscle-sparing breast reconstruction techniques to create a new breast using your own tissue. We limit lymph node removal to reduce the risk of surgery-related lymphedema by using techniques such as sentinel lymph node biopsy and neoadjuvant therapy. At the same time, our care model incorporates expertise in techniques including proton therapy to reduce radiation exposure to healthy normal tissues to prevent side effects.

Your care journey with Mayo Clinic doesn't stop when you return home

Mayo Clinic offers remote capability to monitor your case through eConsults with your local providers and telemedicine to your home. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, conducted over 34,000 virtual visits in January 2021 alone. Carry our expertise with you throughout your journey.

April 27, 2022
  1. AskMayoExpert. Breast cancer. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  2. Breast cancer. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 28, 2017.
  3. Townsend CM Jr, et al. Diseases of the breast. In: Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 28, 2017.
  4. Leading new cancer cases and deaths — 2017 estimates. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/all-cancer-facts-figures/cancer-facts-figures-2017.html. Accessed June 29, 2017.
  5. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 21, 2017.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Breast reconstruction. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  7. What you need to know about breast cancer. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/wyntk-breast-cancer. Accessed June 29, 2017.
  8. Breast cancer risk assessment and screening in average-risk women. American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. https://www.acog.org/Resources-And-Publications/Practice-Bulletins/Committee-on-Practice-Bulletins-Gynecology/Breast-Cancer-Risk-Assessment-and-Screening-in-Average-Risk-Women. Accessed June 28, 2017.
  9. Cancer‐related fatigue. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 28, 2017.
  10. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 28, 2017.
  11. McDermott AM, et al. Surgeon and breast unit volume-outcome relationships in breast cancer surgery and treatment. Annals of Surgery. 2013;258:808.
  12. AskMayoExpert. Tamoxifen and CYP2D6 (pharmacogenomics). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  13. Breast SPOREs. National Cancer Institute. https://trp.cancer.gov/spores/breast.htm. Accessed July 3, 2017.
  14. National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers. American College of Surgeons. https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/napbc. Accessed July 3, 2017.
  15. Toledo E, et al. Mediterranean diet and invasive breast cancer risk among women at high cardiovascular risk in the PREDIMED trial. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2015;175:1752.
  16. Breast cancer prevention — Patient version (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/hp/breast-prevention-pdq. Accessed June 28, 2017.
  17. Pruthi S, et al. Successful implementation of a telemedicine-based counseling program for high-risk patients with breast cancer. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2013;88:68.
  18. Pruthi S (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 24, 2017.
  19. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 29, 2019.
  20. Anders CK, et al. Epidemiology, risk factors and the clinical approach to ER/PR negative, HER2-negative (triple negative) breast cancer. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed May 3, 2019.
  21. Couch FJ, et al. Associations between cancer predisposition testing panel genes and breast cancer. JAMA Oncology. 2017;3:1190.

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