Mayo Clinic's approach

Liver transplant surgical consultation at Mayo Clinic Liver transplant surgical consultation at Mayo Clinic

At Mayo Clinic, a team of surgeons, doctors, transplant nurses and other health professionals take care of you before, during and after transplant.

  • Teamwork. At Mayo Clinic, a team of surgeons, doctors, transplant nurses, pharmacists, social workers and other health professionals take care of you before, during and after transplant. They provide quality care focused on the needs of you and your family.
  • Coordinated care. Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion — your care is discussed among the team, your test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and your transplant care team works together to determine what's best for you.
  • Experience. As a three-site institution, Mayo Clinic has one of the largest liver transplant programs in the United States. Its liver transplant team is recognized nationally and internationally for its expertise in comprehensive specialty treatment for people with serious liver conditions.
  • Advanced technology. The innovations and technology of Mayo Clinic's liver transplant team make transplants available to more people. Our doctors and surgeons offer specialized procedures available at only a small number of institutions. These services include heart-liver transplants, treatment for bile duct cancer, and treatment for obese patients who need liver transplant with weight-loss surgery (sleeve gastrectomy).
  • Research. Researchers at Mayo Clinic are actively engaged in developing new technologies, treatments and techniques to make transplants safer and available to more people. For example, Mayo Clinic researchers study how to limit immune system rejection after liver transplant and how to use cell therapies to improve outcomes.

    At Mayo Clinic, you may have access to ongoing clinical trials, research and new treatments.

Care team roles Care team roles

Health care professionals trained in many medical specialties work together as a team to ensure favorable outcomes from your liver transplant.

The Mayo Clinic experience and patient stories

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

  1. Liver and Kidney Transplants Revive Ron Hale's Zest for Life

    A host of serious medical problems put Ron Hale on a downward spiral of deteriorating health. But a liver and a kidney transplant at Mayo Clinic stopped Ron's decline and dramatically improved his quality of life. Diagnosed with cirrhosis in March 2013, Ron Hale spent several long years coping with declining health and frequent hospitalizations. [...]

  2. For Jim Heinl, Fighting Cancer is a Team Effort

    With his wife by his side and a team of experts at Mayo Clinic to help him through, Jim Heinl faced down a cancer recurrence and then went back to a life focused on family. First diagnosed at age 16, Jim Heinl knows full well what it's like to be forced to deal with cancer. [...]

  3. Better Communication Paves the Way for Dramatic Change in Carolyn Ostrout's Health

    Plagued by symptoms of cirrhosis and unclear communication, Carolyn Ostrout found her health was failing. But a visit to Mayo Clinic that included working with an American Sign Language interpreter led the way to a liver transplant and dramatic improvement in her health.? February 2017 was a big month for Carolyn and Bruce Ostrout. The [...]

  4. The Liver Transplant a Hurricane Couldn't Stop

    When Hurricane Matthew blew into the East Coast, the storm brought significant destruction with it. But it couldn't derail Robert Gall's liver transplant and his second chance for a healthy life.? When it struck the United States in October 2016, Hurricane Matthew brought significant destruction and devastation, especially to people along the East Coast. But [...]

  5. After a Liver Transplant, Financial Adviser Turns to Helping Others

    Owning a successful financial planning firm for 20 years taught Terrance McMahon to plan for the future and for the unexpected. On May 26, 2016, all those years of planning became critical for Terrance. That day, heart palpitations sent him to a local hospital in Manchester, New Hampshire, where he lived. Although he thought he [...]

  6. Friend's Generosity and Successful Transplant Give Maikki Nekton a New Way of Looking at the World

    Maikki Nekton was 32 years old when she had a life-saving liver transplant, thanks to her good friend, Jenifer DeMattia, who donated a portion of her own liver to Maikki. Prior to the transplant, Maikki worked as a clinical social worker in the Maryland school system and for nonprofit organizations. Jenifer was her co-worker, and [...]

  7. Liver Transplant Gives Jacksonville Man New Hope, Twice

    There is no doubt in Richard Parker?s mind that he?s been given not one, but two new leases on life because of Mayo Clinic. Richard underwent a liver transplant in 2007 at Mayo Clinic?s Florida campus. For years after that, all was well. But then, in 2016, his transplanted liver failed, and he turned to [...]

  8. Sharing Part of His Liver, Brother-in-Law Offers Something Greater: A Future

    Isaac Jackson was living a peaceful life, with?a large, loving family, a successful law practice, and lifelong friends, when in early 2014, his life changed dramatically. In January, Isaac began feeling sick whenever he ate. A visit to his primary care doctor in his hometown of Eugene, Oregon, led to an initial diagnosis of gallstones. [...]

  9. Liver Transplant Allows Young Father to Be There for His Family

    Bryan Duncan didn?t think twice about the lab tests he had as part of a routine medical checkup in the fall of 2014. A 29-year-old father of two small children, Bryan led a busy life, didn?t have any health problems, and felt fine. When the test results came back, though, they showed enzyme levels in [...]

  10. After a Long, Long Wait, a Transplant, Gratitude and Goodbyes

    When Randy Marlow checked into Mayo Clinic Hospital's Saint Marys Campus, he knew his hospital stay would be lengthy. He just wasn’t expecting it to last one year, seven months and 21 days. As someone who needed dual heart and liver transplants, Randy knew the probability of two suitable donor organs becoming available at the [...]

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Expertise and rankings

Transplant team at Mayo Clinic Transplant team at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic's three-site Liver Transplant Program is one of the largest in the country.

Each year, Mayo's doctors and surgeons diagnose and treat thousands of people with liver disease. Mayo Clinic's three-site Liver Transplant Program is one of the largest in the country.

Mayo Clinic also has one of the largest living-donor programs in the United States. Living-donor transplant is an option that, for many people, reduces time on the waiting list for a donor liver and improves outcomes.

Experience

Mayo Clinic's Liver Transplant Program was established in 1985. Since then, Mayo Clinic has completed more than 6,700 transplants in children and adults. In 2016, Mayo Clinic's Florida campus completed its 3,000th liver transplant, a milestone that very few centers nationwide have achieved.

Innovation and research

The lifesaving potential of bioartificial livers

Researchers are developing a bioartificial liver.

Click here for an infographic to learn more

The liver transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders and innovators in heart-liver transplants, transplants for people with liver cancer and use of anti-rejection drugs that help ensure positive outcomes.

People with challenging health situations come to Mayo Clinic for help because our doctors and surgeons are experts in specialized liver transplant options.

The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for liver transplant research. For example, Mayo Clinic researchers are developing a bioartificial liver that could help patients cope as they await a donor liver.

Nationally recognized expertise

Liver transplant outcomes at Mayo Clinic compare favorably with the national average.

Volumes and outcomes

 

Mayo Clinic doctors' experience and integrated team approach results in transplant outcomes that compare favorably with national averages. Teams work with transplant recipients before, during and after surgery to ensure the greatest likelihood of superior results.

Volumes and statistics are maintained separately for the three Mayo Clinic locations. Taken together or separately, transplant recipients at Mayo Clinic enjoy excellent results.

Locations, travel and lodging

The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center offers care and housing for transplant patients and their families in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Liver transplant costs and insurance information

Mayo Clinic has dedicated transplant financial services representatives and social workers who can assist you with insurance and financial questions regarding your transplant.

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. Many insurance companies require you to get preapproval authorization prior to transplant services.

Insurance information

Before your transplant, it's important that you work closely with your insurance company to understand your benefit plan. You'll be responsible for any of your transplant and medical care costs not covered by your insurance company.

You may want to ask your insurance company several questions regarding your transplant expenses, such as:

  • What is the specific coverage of my plan? What are my deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, lifetime maximum amount and annual maximum amounts for both medical care and transplant services?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period clause? If so, what is the time frame? Can this be waived?
  • Does my plan include pharmacy coverage? If so, will my plan cover my current medications and immunosuppressant medications?
  • Does my plan require any special approvals for evaluation or transplant? How long does the approval process take once submitted to insurance?
  • Does my plan cover my transportation and lodging expenses during my transplant care?
  • Does my current insurance require enrollment in Medicare when eligible?
  • Does my insurance follow Medicare Coordination of Benefits guidelines?
  • How will my current coverage change after enrolling in Medicare? Will my plan become a supplemental or secondary plan?

If your plan is a Medicare supplement, ask questions including:

  • Does my plan follow Medicare guidelines?
  • Does my plan cover Medicare Part A and B deductible and coinsurance?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period? If so, what is the time frame?
  • Does my plan offer an option for Medicare Part D coverage?

Other expenses

Please plan for other expenses that may occur related to your transplant, which may include follow-up medical appointments, long-term medications, caregiver expenses, travel, parking, lodging and other expenses.

For international patients

Mayo Clinic has dedicated international patient account representatives who can assist you with questions regarding your costs and insurance. Read more about international financial services.

Case managers

Mayo Clinic financial staff will work closely with your case managers from your insurance company. Your case manager, who is assigned to you, is available to answer questions and calls related to your insurance costs.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Sept. 24, 2016
References
  1. Feldman M, et al. Liver transplantation. In: Sleisenger & Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  2. Liver transplant. American Liver Foundation. http://www.liverfoundation.org/abouttheliver/info/transplant/. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  3. What I need to know about liver transplantation. National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/livertransplant_ez/. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  4. Questions & answers for transplant candidates about MELD and PELD. United Network for Organ Sharing. http://www.unos.org/docs/MELD_PELD. Accessed May 28, 2014.
  5. Liver Kaplan-Meier patient survival rates for transplants performed: 1997-2004. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/data/view-data-reports/national-data/#. Accessed May 28, 2016.
  6. Selecting a hospital. United Network for Organ Sharing http://www.transplantliving.org/before-the-transplant/getting-on-the-list/selecting-a-hospital/. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  7. Dove LM, et al. Liver transplantation in adults: Patient selection and pretransplantation evaluation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  8. Bambha K, et al. Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  9. Cotler S. Living donor liver transplantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  10. Partnering with your transplant team: The patient's guide to transplantation. United Network for Organ Sharing. https://www.unos.org/wp-content/uploads/unos/WEPNTK.pdf. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  11. Kim WR, et al. OPTN/SRTR 2014 annual data report: Liver. American Journal of Transplantation. 2016;16:11.
  12. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Liver transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  13. Glorioso JM, et al. Pivotal preclinical trial of the spheroid reservoir bioartificial liver. Journal of Hepatology. 2015;63:388.
  14. Yu Y, et al. Cell therapies for liver diseases. Liver Transplantation. 2012;18:9.
  15. Taner T, et al. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney International. 2016;89:909.
  16. De Assuncao TM, et al. Development and characterization of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cholangiocytes. Laboratory Investigation. 2015;95:684.
  17. Croome KP, et al. The use of donation after cardiac death allografts does not increase recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. American Journal of Transplantation. 2015;15:2704.
  18. Tincani G, et al. Operative risks of domino liver transplantation for the familial amyloid polyneuropathy liver donor and recipient: A double analysis. American Journal of Transplantation. 2011;11:750.
  19. Kitchens WH. Domino liver transplantation: Indications, techniques, and outcomes. Transplantation Reviews. 2011;25:167.
  20. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. http://www.srtr.org/default.aspx. Accessed April 11, 2016.
  21. Heimbach JK (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 19, 2016.