Mayo Clinic's approach

  • Teamwork. Mayo Clinic doctors with training in brain conditions (neurologists), brain surgeons (neurosurgeons), doctors with training in mental health conditions (psychiatrists), pain specialists, specialized programming nurses and other specialists use an integrated team approach to treat people who have deep brain stimulation.
  • Experience. Mayo Clinic specialists have successfully used deep brain stimulation to treat hundreds of people who have essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Recently, doctors have used deep brain stimulation to treat people who have obsessive-compulsive disorder, cluster headaches, Tourette syndrome, epilepsy and chronic pain that hasn't responded to other treatments.
  • Research. The Mayo Clinic deep brain stimulation teams are studying the use of new types of stimulating systems for treatment of essential tremor and Parkinson's disease.

    Mayo Clinic doctors are also researching use of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder and other conditions.

    In addition, Mayo Clinic researchers are studying the possibility of performing the initial deep brain stimulation surgery while people are unconscious instead of awake.

    Neurologists in the Mayo Clinic Systems Electrophysiology Laboratory are studying the use of special pulse generators that can also record brain waves from the deep brain stimulating electrodes to determine how stimulation affects these brain waves. Neurosurgeons in the Neural Engineering Laboratory at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota collaborate with engineers to create or adjust devices used to treat conditions affecting your brain.

  • Advanced surgical technology. Specialists at Mayo Clinic use computer-assisted brain surgery, intraoperative MRI and awake brain surgery during deep brain stimulation.

The Mayo Clinic experience and patient stories

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

Expertise and rankings

Nationally recognized expertise

Neurosurgeons first used deep brain stimulation in the United States in 1997 at the Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic doctors now treat about 200 people each year with deep brain stimulation.

Mayo Clinic specialists have successfully used deep brain stimulation to treat hundreds of people who have essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and dystonia.

Recently, doctors have also used deep brain stimulation to treat people who have obsessive-compulsive disorder, cluster headaches, Tourette syndrome, epilepsy and chronic pain that hasn't responded to other treatments.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's neurosurgery and neurology departments' expertise and rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Nov. 11, 2015
References
  1. Miocinovic S, et al. History, applications, and mechanisms of deep brain stimulation. JAMA Neurology. 2013;70:163.
  2. Karas PJ, et al. Deep brain stimulation: A mechanistic and clinical update. Neurosurgical Focus. 2013;35:1.
  3. Brunicardi FC, et al., eds. Neurosurgery. In: Schwartz's Principles of Surgery. 9th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2010. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 31, 2015.
  4. Cleary DR, et al. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders: Where are we now. Neurosurgical Focus. 2015;38:1.
  5. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/deep_brain_stimulation/deep_brain_stimulation.htm. Accessed Sept. 1, 2015.
  6. Fenoy AJ, et al. Risks of common complications in deep brain stimulation surgery: Management and avoidance. Journal of Neurosurgery. 2014;120:132.
  7. Tarsy D. Surgical treatment of Parkinson disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 28, 2015.
  8. Venkatraghavan L. Anesthesia for patients having deep brain stimulator implantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 28, 2015.
  9. Timmermann L, et al. Multiple-source current steering in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease (the VANTAGE study): A non-randomised, prospective, multicentre, open-label study. The Lancet Neurology. 2015;14:693.
  10. Krack P, et al. Deep brain stimulation: From neurology to psychiatry? Trends in Neurosciences. 2010;33:474.
  11. Riggs EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 6, 2015.