Diagnosis

If your doctor suspects pancreatic cancer, he or she may have you undergo one or more of the following tests:

  • Imaging tests that create pictures of your internal organs. These tests help your doctors visualize your internal organs, including the pancreas. Techniques used to diagnose pancreatic cancer include ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and, sometimes, positron emission tomography (PET) scans.
  • Using a scope to create ultrasound pictures of your pancreas. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) uses an ultrasound device to make images of your pancreas from inside your abdomen. The device is passed through a thin, flexible tube (endoscope) down your esophagus and into your stomach in order to obtain the images.
  • Removing a tissue sample for testing (biopsy). A biopsy is a procedure to remove a small sample of tissue for examination under a microscope. Your doctor may obtain a sample of tissue from the pancreas by inserting a needle through your skin and into your pancreas (fine-needle aspiration). Or he or she may remove a sample during EUS, guiding special tools into the pancreas.
  • Blood test. Your doctor may test your blood for specific proteins (tumor markers) shed by pancreatic cancer cells. One tumor marker test used in pancreatic cancer is called CA19-9. But the test isn't always reliable, and it isn't clear how best to use the CA19-9 test results. Some doctors measure your levels before, during and after treatment.

If your doctor confirms a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, he or she tries to determine the extent (stage) of the cancer. Using information from staging tests, your doctor assigns your pancreatic cancer a stage, which helps determine what treatments are available to you.

Stages of pancreatic cancer

The stages of pancreatic cancer are:

  • Stage I. Cancer is confined to the pancreas and can be removed using surgery.
  • Stage II. Cancer has spread beyond the pancreas to nearby tissues and organs and may have spread to the lymph nodes. At this stage, surgery may be possible to remove the cancer.
  • Stage III. Cancer has spread beyond the pancreas to the major blood vessels around the pancreas and may have spread to the lymph nodes. Surgery may or may not be possible to remove the cancer at this stage.
  • Stage IV. Cancer has spread to distant sites beyond the pancreas, such as the liver, lungs and the lining that surrounds your abdominal organs (peritoneum). Surgery isn't an option at this stage.

Don't hesitate to ask your doctor about his or her experience with diagnosing pancreatic cancer. If you have any doubts, get a second opinion.

Treatment

Treatment for pancreatic cancer depends on the stage and location of the cancer as well as on your overall health and personal preferences. For most people, the first goal of pancreatic cancer treatment is to eliminate the cancer, when possible. When that isn't an option, the focus may be on improving your quality of life and preventing the cancer from growing or causing more harm.

Treatment may include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of these. When pancreatic cancer is advanced and these treatments aren't likely to offer a benefit, your doctor will offer symptom relief (palliative care) that makes you as comfortable as possible.

Surgery

Operations used in people with pancreatic cancer include:

  • Surgery for tumors in the pancreatic head. If your cancer is located in the head of the pancreas, you may consider an operation called a Whipple procedure (pancreaticoduodenectomy).

    The Whipple procedure is technically difficult operation to remove the head of the pancreas, the first part of the small intestine (duodenum), the gallbladder and part of the bile duct. In some situations, part of the stomach and nearby lymph nodes may be removed as well. Your surgeon reconnects the remaining parts of your pancreas, stomach and intestines to allow you to digest food.

  • Surgery for tumors in the pancreatic body and tail. Surgery to remove the left side (body and tail) of the pancreas is called distal pancreatectomy. Your surgeon may also remove your spleen.
  • Surgery to remove the entire pancreas. In some people, the entire pancreas may need to be removed. This is called total pancreatectomy. You can live relatively normally without a pancreas but do need lifelong insulin and enzyme replacement.
  • Surgery for tumors affecting nearby blood vessels. Many people with advanced pancreatic cancer are not considered eligible for the Whipple procedure or other pancreatic surgeries if their tumors involve nearby blood vessels. At a very few medical centers in the United States, highly specialized and experienced surgeons will safely perform these operations with removal and reconstruction of parts of blood vessels in select patients.

Each of these surgeries carries the risk of bleeding and infection. After surgery some people experience nausea and vomiting if the stomach has difficulty emptying (delayed gastric emptying). Expect a long recovery after any of these procedures. You'll spend several days in the hospital and then recover for several weeks at home.

Extensive research shows pancreatic cancer surgery tends to cause fewer complications when done by highly experienced surgeons at centers that do many of these operations. Don't hesitate to ask about your surgeon's and hospital's experience with pancreatic cancer surgery. If you have any doubts, get a second opinion.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to help kill cancer cells. These drugs can be injected into a vein or taken orally. You may receive one chemotherapy drug or a combination of them.

Chemotherapy can also be combined with radiation therapy (chemoradiation). Chemoradiation is typically used to treat cancer that has spread beyond the pancreas, but only to nearby organs and not to distant regions of the body. At specialized medical centers, this combination may be used before surgery to help shrink the tumor. Sometimes it is used after surgery to reduce the risk that pancreatic cancer may recur.

In people with advanced pancreatic cancer, chemotherapy is often used to control cancer growth and prolong survival.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams, such as those made from X-rays and protons, to destroy cancer cells. You may receive radiation treatments before or after cancer surgery, often in combination with chemotherapy. Or your doctor may recommend a combination of radiation and chemotherapy treatments when your cancer can't be treated surgically.

Radiation therapy usually comes from a machine that moves around you, directing radiation to specific points on your body (external beam radiation). In specialized medical centers, radiation therapy may be delivered during surgery (intraoperative radiation).

Radiation therapy traditionally uses X-rays to treat cancer. Some medical centers offer proton beam radiation therapy, which may be a treatment option for some people with advanced pancreatic cancer.

Clinical trials

Clinical trials are studies to test new treatments, such as systemic therapy, and new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy. If the treatment being studied proves to be safer and more effective than are current treatments, it can become the new standard of care.

Clinical trials for pancreatic cancer might give you a chance to try new targeted therapy, chemotherapy drugs, immunotherapy treatments or vaccines.

Clinical trials can't guarantee a cure, and they might have serious or unexpected side effects. On the other hand, cancer clinical trials are closely monitored to ensure they're conducted as safely as possible. And they offer access to treatments that wouldn't otherwise be available to you.

Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials might be appropriate for you.

Supportive (palliative) care

Palliative care is specialized medical care that focuses on providing relief from pain and other symptoms of a serious illness. Palliative care specialists work with you, your family and your other doctors to provide an extra layer of support that complements your ongoing care. Palliative care can be used while undergoing aggressive treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

When palliative care is used along with other appropriate treatments — even soon after the diagnosis — people with cancer may feel better and live longer.

Palliative care is provided by teams of doctors, nurses and other specially trained professionals. These teams aim to improve the quality of life for people with cancer and their families. Palliative care is not the same as hospice care or end-of-life care.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Alternative medicine

Some integrative and alternative medicine approaches may help with signs and symptoms you experience due to your cancer or cancer treatments.

Treatments to help you cope with distress

People with cancer frequently experience distress. Some research suggests distress is more common in people with pancreatic cancer than it is in people with other types of cancer.

If you're distressed, you may have difficulty sleeping and find yourself constantly thinking about your cancer. You may feel angry or sad.

Discuss your feelings with your doctor. Specialists can help you sort through your feelings and help you devise strategies for coping. In some cases, medications may help.

Integrative medicine and alternative therapies may also help you cope with distress. Examples include:

  • Art therapy
  • Exercise
  • Meditation
  • Music therapy
  • Relaxation exercises
  • Spirituality

Talk with your doctor if you're interested in these treatment options.

Coping and support

Learning you have a life-threatening illness can be devastating. Some of the following suggestions may help:

  • Learn what you need to know about your cancer. Learn enough about your cancer to help you make decisions about your care. Ask your doctor about the details of your cancer and your treatment options. Ask about trusted sources of further information.

    If you're doing your own research, good places to start include the National Cancer Institute and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

  • Assemble a support system. Ask your friends and family to form a support network for you. They may feel helpless and uncertain after your diagnosis. Helping you with simple tasks might give them comfort. And you might find relief in not having to worry about certain tasks. Think of things you want help with, such as meal preparation or getting to appointments.
  • Find someone to talk with. Although friends and family can be your best allies, in some cases they have difficulty coping with the shock of your diagnosis. In these cases, talking with a counselor, medical social worker, or a pastoral or religious counselor can be helpful. Ask your doctor for a referral.
  • Connect with other cancer survivors. You may find comfort in talking with other cancer survivors. Contact your local chapter of the American Cancer Society to find cancer support groups in your area. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network can connect you with a pancreatic cancer survivor who can provide support by phone or email.
  • Consider hospice. Hospice care provides comfort and support to terminally ill people and their loved ones. It allows family and friends — with the aid of nurses, social workers and trained volunteers — to care for and comfort a loved one at home or in a hospice residence. Hospice care also provides emotional, social and spiritual support for people who are ill and those closest to them.

Preparing for your appointment

Start by making an appointment with your doctor if you have any signs or symptoms that worry you. He or she may recommend tests and procedures to investigate your signs and symptoms. If your doctor determines you have pancreatic cancer, he or she might refer you to:

  • A doctor who treats cancer (oncologist)
  • A doctor who uses radiation to treat cancer (radiation oncologist)
  • A surgeon who specializes in operations involving the digestive tract
  • A doctor who diagnoses and treats digestive conditions (gastroenterologist)

What you can do

  • Be aware of any pre-appointment restrictions, such as restricting your diet.
  • List your symptoms, including any that seem unrelated to the reason you scheduled the appointment.
  • List key personal information, including any recent changes or stressors.
  • List all of your medications, vitamins and supplements, including doses.
  • Ask a relative or friend to accompany you, to help you remember what the doctor says.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • Do I have pancreatic cancer?
  • What is the stage of my cancer?
  • Will I need additional tests?
  • Can my cancer be cured?
  • What are my treatment options?
  • Can any treatment help me live longer?
  • What are the potential risks of each treatment?
  • Is there one treatment you think is best for me?
  • What advice would you give a friend or a family member in my situation?
  • What is your experience with pancreatic cancer diagnosis and treatment? How many surgical procedures for this type of cancer are done each year at this medical center?
  • I'm experiencing these signs and symptoms. What can be done to help me feel more comfortable?
  • What clinical trials are available for pancreatic cancer? Am I eligible for any?
  • Am I eligible for molecular profiling of my cancer?
  • Do you have any brochures or other printed material that I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • When did you first begin experiencing symptoms?
  • How severe are your symptoms? Are they occasional or continuous?
  • Does anything improve or worsen your symptoms?

Pancreatic cancer care at Mayo Clinic

June 06, 2017
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Pancreatic cancer. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  3. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Carcinoma of the pancreas. In: Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  4. What you need to know about cancer of the pancreas. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/wyntk/pancreas. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  5. Distress management. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  6. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  7. Clark KL, et al. Psychological distress in patients with pancreatic cancer — An understudied group. Psycho-Oncology. 2010;19:1313.
  8. Tee MC, et al. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy: Is it an effective procedure for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma? Advances in Surgery. 2015;49:143.
  9. Sugumar A, et al. Distinguishing pancreatic cancer from autoimmune pancreatitis. Current Gastroenterology Reports. 2010;12:91.
  10. Pancreatic SPOREs. National Cancer Institute. http://trp.cancer.gov/spores/pancreatic.htm. Accessed June 10, 2016.
  11. Pancreatic cancer genetic epidemiology (PACGENE) study. ClinicalTrials.gov. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00526578. Accessed June 10, 2016.
  12. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Sept. 20, 2016.
  13. Ramanathan RK (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz. Aug. 30, 2016.
  14. McWilliams RR (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 2, 2017.
  15. Hallemeier CL (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 28, 2016.
  16. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Surgery on the extrahepatic bile duct, duodenum, papilla, or pancreas. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2012.
  17. Dahlin C, ed. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. 3rd ed. Pittsburgh, Pa.: National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. 2013. http://www.nationalconsensusproject.org/guidelines_download2.aspx. Accessed Dec. 22, 2016.
  18. AskMayoExpert. Palliative care and end-of-life hospice. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  19. Wu QJ, et al. Consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces risk of pancreatic cancer: Evidence from epidemiological studies. European Journal of Pancreatic Cancer prevention. 2016;25:196.
  20. Antwi SO, et al. Pancreatic cancer: Associations of inflammatory potential of diet, cigarette smoking and long-standing diabetes. Carcinogenesis. 2016;37:481.
  21. Moris M, et al. Risk factors for malignant progression of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Digestive and Liver Disease. 2015;47:495.
  22. Pancreatic cancer. Merck Manual Professional Version. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gastrointestinal-disorders/tumors-of-the-gi-tract/pancreatic-cancer. Accessed Jan. 16, 2017.
  23. Thiels CA, et al. Outcomes of pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Are combined procedures justified? Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2016;20:891.
  24. Shubert CR, et al. Overall survival is increased among stage III pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy compared to surgery first and adjuvant chemotherapy: An intention to treat analysis of the National Cancer Database. Surgery. 2016;160:1080.
  25. Ivanics T, et al. Small cell carcinoma of the pancreas: A surgical disease. Pancreas. 2016;45:1461.
  26. Mangu BEP, et al. Locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and clinical practice guidelines. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2016;34:2654.
  27. Moris M, et al. Risk factors for malignant progression of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Digestive and Liver Disease. 2015;47:495.
  28. Truty MJ (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 13, 2017.
  29. Merrell KW, et al. Predictors of locoregional failure and impact on overall survival in patients with resected exocrine pancreatic cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology. 2016; 94:561. http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0360301615266850/1-s2.0-S0360301615266850-main.pdf?_tid=246e86d0-dc38-11e6-94d3-00000aacb35e&acdnat=1484604617_48259687104ce7b2e3bdc7c9d165c12d. Accessed Jan. 16, 2017.
  30. Thind K et al. Immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer treatment: A new frontier. Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology. 2017;10:168.
  31. Loncle C, et al. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KRAS-G12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation. Cell Death and Disease. 2016;7:32295. http://www.nature.com/cddis/journal/v7/n7/full/cddis2016202a.html. Accessed Feb. 22, 2017.
  32. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 27, 2017.
  33. Goldman L, et al., eds. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 10, 2017.

Connect with others

News, connections and conversations for your health

Recent posts

Share your experience

Share your Mayo Clinic experience with others using social media.