Diagnosis

Your doctor makes a diagnosis of lichen planus based on your symptoms, your medical history, a physical examination and, if necessary, the results of lab tests. These tests may include:

  • Biopsy. Your doctor removes a small piece of affected tissue for examination under a microscope. The tissue is analyzed to determine whether it has the cell patterns characteristic of lichen planus.
  • Hepatitis C test. You may have your blood drawn to test for hepatitis C, which is a possible trigger for lichen planus.
  • Allergy tests. Your doctor may refer you to an allergy specialist (allergist) or dermatologist to find out if you're allergic to something that can trigger lichen planus.

Other tests may be needed if your doctor suspects you have any of the several variations of lichen planus, such as the type that affects the esophagus, genitals, ears or mouth.

Treatment

Lichen planus on the skin often clears up on its own in months to years. If the disease affects your mucous membranes, it tends to be more resistant to treatment and prone to recur. Whatever treatment you use, you'll need to visit your doctor for follow-up appointments about once a year.

Medications and other treatments might help relieve itching, ease pain and promote healing. Therapy can be challenging. Talk with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits against possible side effects of treatment.

Corticosteroids

The first choice for treatment of lichen planus is usually a prescription corticosteroid cream or ointment. If that doesn't help and your condition is severe or widespread, your doctor might suggest a corticosteroid pill or injection.

Common side effects of topical corticosteroids include skin irritation or thinning where the cream is applied and oral thrush. Corticosteroids are considered safe when taken as directed and for short-term use.

Oral anti-infections drugs

Other oral medicines used in selected situations for this condition are the antimalarial hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) and the antibiotic metronidazole (Flagyl, others).

Immune response medicines

Severe signs and symptoms may require prescription medications that suppress or modify your body's immune response, such as azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran), mycophenolate (Cellcept), cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmune, others) and methotrexate (Trexall).

Antihistamines

An antihistamine medication taken by mouth might relieve the itching of lichen planus.

Light therapy

Light therapy (phototherapy) may help clear up lichen planus affecting the skin. The most common phototherapy for lichen planus uses ultraviolet B (UVB) light, which penetrates only the upper layer of skin (epidermis). Light therapy usually requires two to three treatments a week for several weeks.

This therapy isn't recommended for dark-skinned people, who have an increased risk of their skin staying slightly darker even after the rash clears up.

Retinoids

If your condition doesn't respond to corticosteroids or light therapy, your doctor might prescribe a retinoid medication taken by mouth, such as acitretin (Soriatane).

Retinoids can cause birth defects, so these drugs aren't recommended for women who are pregnant or may become pregnant. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose a different treatment.

Dealing with triggers

If your doctor suspects that your lichen planus is related to hepatitis C infection, allergies or a drug you take, you might need other treatment. For example, you may need to switch medications or avoid offending allergens. Your doctor may refer you to an allergist or, in the case of a hepatitis C infection, a specialist in liver disease (hepatologist) for further treatment.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Self-care measures can help reduce the itching and discomfort caused by lichen planus. These include:

  • Soaking in a bathtub with colloidal oatmeal (Aveeno, others), followed by moisturizing lotion
  • Applying cool compresses
  • Using an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or ointment, containing at least 1 percent hydrocortisone (if you're not using a prescription topical corticosteroid)
  • Avoiding scratching or injuring your skin

For oral lichen planus, good oral hygiene and regular dentist visits are important. You can help reduce the pain of mouth sores by avoiding:

  • Smoking
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Consuming spicy or acidic food and drink

Alternative medicine

A couple of small clinical trials have suggested the benefit of aloe vera gel for treating lichen planus of the mouth and vulva.

Look into alternative medicine approaches that help reduce stress, as stress can worsen the signs and symptoms of lichen planus.

Talk with your doctor before trying an alternative treatment for lichen planus. Some alternative medicines or vitamin supplements result in serious adverse reactions when combined with prescription medicines.

Preparing for your appointment

You'll likely start by seeing your primary care doctor. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin diseases (dermatologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment make a list of:

  • Symptoms you've been having and for how long
  • All medications, vitamins and supplements you take, including the doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

For lichen planus, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Are there other possible causes?
  • Do I need any tests?
  • How long will these skin changes last?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What side effects can I expect from treatment?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Are there any restrictions that I need to follow?
  • Should I see a specialist?
  • Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing?
  • Do you have any brochures or other printed material I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • Where on your body have you found the lesions?
  • Are the affected areas itchy, painful or uncomfortable?
  • How would you describe the severity of the pain or discomfort — mild, moderate or severe?
  • Have you recently started new medications?
  • Have you recently had immunizations?
  • Do you have any allergies?
Feb. 20, 2019
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Oral lichen planus. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2018.
  2. Le Cleach L, et al. Lichen planus. New England Journal of Medicine. 2012;366:723.
  3. Sharma A, et al. Lichen planus: An update and review. Cutis. 2012;90:17.
  4. Bradford J, et al. Management of vulvovaginal lichen planus: A new approach. Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease. 2013;17:28.
  5. Sartori-Valinotti JC, et al. A 10-year review of otic lichen planus: The Mayo Clinic experience. JAMA Dermatology. 2013;149:1082.
  6. Goldstein BG, et al. Lichen planus. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Dec. 31, 2018.
  7. Goldstein BG, et al. General principles of dermatologic therapy and topical corticosteroid use. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Jan. 4, 2019.
  8. Lichen planus. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/. Accessed Jan. 7, 2019.
  9. Pickert A. Concise review of lichen planus and lichenoid dermatoses. Cutis. 2012;90:e1.
  10. Lichen planus. American Academy of Dermatology. https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/rashes/lichen-planus. Accessed Jan. 7, 2019.
  11. Gibson LE (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 16, 2019.