Diagnosis

Tests to help diagnose gout may include:

  • Joint fluid test. Your doctor may use a needle to draw fluid from your affected joint. Urate crystals may be visible when the fluid is examined under a microscope.
  • Blood test. Your doctor may recommend a blood test to measure the levels of uric acid and creatinine in your blood. Blood test results can be misleading, though. Some people have high uric acid levels, but never experience gout. And some people have signs and symptoms of gout, but don't have unusual levels of uric acid in their blood.
  • X-ray imaging. Joint X-rays can be helpful to rule out other causes of joint inflammation.
  • Ultrasound. Musculoskeletal ultrasound can detect urate crystals in a joint or in a tophus. This technique is more widely used in Europe than in the United States.
  • Dual energy CT scan. This type of imaging can detect the presence of urate crystals in a joint, even when it is not acutely inflamed. This test is not used routinely in clinical practice due to the expense and is not widely available.

Treatment

Treatment for gout usually involves medications. What medications you and your doctor choose will be based on your current health and your own preferences.

Gout medications can be used to treat acute attacks and prevent future attacks. Medications can also reduce your risk of complications from gout, such as the development of tophi from urate crystal deposits.

Medications to treat gout attacks

Drugs used to treat acute attacks and prevent future attacks include:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs include over-the-counter options such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve), as well as more-powerful prescription NSAIDs such as indomethacin (Indocin) or celecoxib (Celebrex).

    Your doctor may prescribe a higher dose to stop an acute attack, followed by a lower daily dose to prevent future attacks.

    NSAIDs carry risks of stomach pain, bleeding and ulcers.

  • Colchicine. Your doctor may recommend colchicine (Colcrys, Mitigare), a type of pain reliever that effectively reduces gout pain. The drug's effectiveness may be offset, however, by side effects such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, especially if taken in large doses.

    After an acute gout attack resolves, your doctor may prescribe a low daily dose of colchicine to prevent future attacks.

  • Corticosteroids. Corticosteroid medications, such as the drug prednisone, may control gout inflammation and pain. Corticosteroids may be in pill form, or they can be injected into your joint.

    Corticosteroids are generally used only in people with gout who can't take either NSAIDs or colchicine. Side effects of corticosteroids may include mood changes, increased blood sugar levels and elevated blood pressure.

Medications to prevent gout complications

If you experience several gout attacks each year, or if your gout attacks are less frequent but particularly painful, your doctor may recommend medication to reduce your risk of gout-related complications. If you already have evidence of damage from gout on joint X-rays, or you have tophi, chronic kidney disease or kidney stones, medications to lower your body's level of uric acid may be recommended. Options include:

  • Medications that block uric acid production. Drugs called xanthine oxidase inhibitors (XOIs), including allopurinol (Aloprim, Lopurin, Zyloprim) and febuxostat (Uloric), limit the amount of uric acid your body makes. This may lower your blood's uric acid level and reduce your risk of gout.

    Side effects of allopurinol include a rash and low blood counts. Febuxostat side effects include rash, nausea and reduced liver function.

  • Medication that improves uric acid removal. These drugs, called uricosurics, include probenecid (Probalan) and lesinurad (Zurampic). Uricosuric drugs improve your kidneys' ability to remove uric acid from your body. This may lower your uric acid levels and reduce your risk of gout, but the level of uric acid in your urine is increased. Side effects include a rash, stomach pain and kidney stones. Lesinurad can be taken only along with an XOI.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Medications are often the most effective way to treat acute gout and can prevent recurrent attacks of gout. However, making certain lifestyle changes also are important, such as:

  • Limiting alcoholic beverages and drinks sweetened with fruit sugar (fructose). Instead, drink plenty of nonalcoholic beverages, especially water.
  • Limiting intake of foods high in purines, such as red meat, organ meats and seafood. Instead, choose low-fat or nondairy products or vegetables.
  • Exercising regularly and losing weight. Keeping your body at a healthy weight reduces your risk of gout.

Alternative medicine

If gout treatments aren't working as well as you'd hoped, you may be interested in trying an alternative approach. Before trying such a treatment on your own, talk with your doctor — to weigh the benefits and risks and learn whether the treatment might interfere with your gout medication.

Because there isn't a lot of research on alternative therapies for gout, however, in some cases the risks aren't known.

Certain foods have been studied for their potential to lower uric acid levels, including:

  • Coffee. Studies have found an association between coffee drinking — both regular and decaffeinated coffee — and lower uric acid levels, though no study has demonstrated how or why coffee may have such an effect.

    The available evidence isn't enough to encourage noncoffee drinkers to start, but it may give researchers clues to new ways of treating gout in the future.

  • Vitamin C. Supplements containing vitamin C may reduce the levels of uric acid in your blood. However, no studies have demonstrated that vitamin C affects the frequency or severity of gout attacks.

    Talk to your doctor about what a reasonable dose of vitamin C may be. And don't forget that you can increase your vitamin C intake by eating more vegetables and fruits, especially oranges.

  • Cherries. Cherries have been reported to lower levels of uric acid, as well as reduce the number of gout attacks. However, more research needs to be done to confirm this. Eating more cherries and drinking cherry extract may be a safe way to supplement your gout treatment, but discuss it with your doctor first.

Other complementary and alternative medicine treatments may help you cope until your gout pain subsides or your medications take effect. For instance, relaxation techniques, such as deep-breathing exercises and meditation, may help take your mind off your pain.

Preparing for your appointment

Make an appointment with your doctor if you have symptoms that are common to gout. After an initial examination, your doctor may refer you to a specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other inflammatory joint conditions (rheumatologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

  • Write down your symptoms, including when they started and how often they occur.
  • Note important personal information, such as any recent changes or major stressors in your life.
  • Make a list of your key medical information, including any other conditions for which you're being treated and the names of any medications, vitamins or supplements you're taking. Your doctor will also want to know if you have any family history of gout.
  • Take a family member or friend along, if possible. Sometimes it can be difficult to remember all the information provided to you during an appointment. Someone who accompanies you may remember something that you missed or forgot.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor. Creating your list of questions in advance can help you make the most of your time with your doctor.

Questions to ask the doctor at the initial appointment include:

  • What are the possible causes of my symptoms or condition?
  • What tests do you recommend?
  • Are there any treatments or lifestyle changes that might help my symptoms now?
  • Should I see a specialist?

Questions to ask if you're referred to a rheumatologist include:

  • What are the possible side effects of the drugs you're prescribing?
  • How soon after beginning treatment should my symptoms start to improve?
  • Do I need to take medications long term?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Do you recommend any changes to my diet?
  • Is it safe for me to drink alcohol?
  • Are there any handouts or websites that you'd recommend for me to learn more about my condition?

If any additional questions occur to you during your medical appointments, don't hesitate to ask.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may reserve time to go over any points you want to talk about in-depth. Your doctor may ask:

  • What are your symptoms?
  • When did you first experience these symptoms?
  • Do your symptoms come and go? How often?
  • Does anything in particular seem to trigger your symptoms, such as certain foods or physical or emotional stress?
  • Are you being treated for any other medical conditions?
  • What medications are you currently taking, including over-the-counter and prescription drugs as well as vitamins and supplements?
  • Do any of your first-degree relatives — such as a parent or sibling — have a history of gout?
  • What do you eat in a typical day?
  • Do you drink alcohol? If so, how much and how often?
Dec. 07, 2017
References
  1. Hochberg MC, et al. Clinical gout. In: Rheumatology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 22, 2017.
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  3. Ferri FF. Gout. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2018. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 22, 2017.
  4. Gout. American College of Rheumatology. http://www.rheumatology.org/Practice/Clinical/Patients/Diseases_And_Conditions/Gout/ . Accessed Sept. 22, 2017.
  5. Questions and answers about gout. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Gout/default.asp. Accessed Sept. 22, 2017.
  6. Becker MA. Prevention of recurrent gout: Pharmacologic urate-lowering therapy and treatment of tophi. https://uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. 28, 2017.
  7. Relaxation techniques for health. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/stress/relaxation.htm. Accessed Sept. 28, 2017.
  8. Becker MA. Treatment of acute gout. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. 22, 2017.
  9. Becker MA. Prevention of recurrent gout: Lifestyle modification and other strategies for risk reduction. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. 22, 2017.
  10. Coffee. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed Sept. 29, 2017.
  11. Kolasinski SL. Food, drink and herbs: Alternative therapies and gout. Current Rheumatology Reports. 2014;16:409.
  12. Khanna D, et al. 2012 American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 1: Systematic nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapeutic approaches to hyperuricemia. Arthritis Care and Research. 2012;64:1431.
  13. AskMayoExpert. Gout. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  14. Chang-Miller A (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz.. Oct. 8, 2017.
  15. Qaseem A, et al. Management of acute and recurrent gout: A practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. 2017;166:58.

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