Mayo Clinic's approach

Teamwork

At Mayo Clinic, an experienced team of specialists, including neurologists, intensive care experts and other specialists, if needed, help provide thorough preoperative, operative and postoperative care.

Experience

Mayo Clinic specialists are experienced in performing tracheostomies in children and adults and in determining if the opening can be closed.

Patient education

Doctors and nurses teach parents and other caregivers about tracheostomy tube management to help them provide the best possible quality of life when the person returns home.

Expertise and rankings

Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) is a medical and surgical specialty that focuses on head and neck diseases and disorders. Mayo Clinic has one of the largest otorhinolaryngology practices in the world, with more than 40 specialists providing care to patients in Arizona, Minnesota and Florida.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Jan. 03, 2018
References
  1. What is a tracheostomy? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/trach. Accessed March 7, 2016.
  2. Hall JB, et al. Tracheostomy. In: Principles of Critical Care. 4th ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2015. http:// accessmedicine.com. Accessed March 9, 2016.
  3. Hyzy RC. Overview of tracheostomy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 9, 2016.
  4. Bair AE. Emergent surgical cricothyrotomy (cricothyroidotomy). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 9, 2016.
  5. Airway establishment and control. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/critical-care-medicine/respiratory-arrest/airway-establishment-and-control. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  6. Flint PW, et al. Tracheotomy. In: Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 15, 2016.
  7. Clinical consensus statement: Tracheostomy care. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery. http://oto.sagepub.com/content/148/1/6. Accessed March 15, 2016.