When to see a doctor

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Nipple discharge is rarely a sign of breast cancer. But it might be a sign of an underlying condition that requires treatment.

If you're still having menstrual periods and your nipple discharge doesn't resolve on its own after your next menstrual cycle and occurs spontaneously, make an appointment with your health care provider to have it evaluated.

If you're past menopause and you have a spontaneous nipple discharge from a single duct in one breast only, see your provider right away for evaluation.

In the meantime, take care to avoid nipple stimulation — including frequent checks for discharge — because stimulation can result in persistent nipple discharge.

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Dec. 04, 2021