Overview

When the muscles and ligaments supporting a woman's pelvic organs weaken, the pelvic organs can drop lower in the pelvis, creating a bulge in the vagina (prolapse). Women most commonly develop pelvic organ prolapse years after childbirth, after a hysterectomy or after menopause. If you have symptoms, such as a feeling of pressure in your pelvic area, see your health care provider.

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Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this condition.

Pelvic organ prolapse care at Mayo Clinic

Nov. 10, 2020
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