Diagnosis

Extremely loose joints, fragile or stretchy skin, and a family history of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome are often enough to make a diagnosis. Genetic tests on a sample of your blood can confirm the diagnosis in rarer forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and help rule out other problems. For hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, the most common form, there is no genetic testing available.

Treatment

There is no cure for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, but treatment can help you manage your symptoms and prevent further complications.

Medications

Your doctor may prescribe drugs to help you control:

  • Pain. Over-the-counter pain relievers — such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve) — are the mainstay of treatment. Stronger medications are only prescribed for acute injuries.
  • Blood pressure. Because blood vessels are more fragile in some types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, your doctor may want to reduce the stress on the vessels by keeping your blood pressure low.

Physical therapy

Joints with weak connective tissue are more likely to dislocate. Exercises to strengthen the muscles and stabilize joints are the primary treatment for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Your physical therapist might also recommend specific braces to help prevent joint dislocations.

Surgical and other procedures

Surgery may be recommended to repair joints damaged by repeated dislocations, or to repair ruptured areas in blood vessels and organs. However, the surgical wounds may not heal properly because the stitches may tear through the fragile tissues.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Lifestyle and home remedies

If you have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, it's important to prevent injuries. Here are a few things you can do to safeguard yourself.

  • Choose sports wisely. Walking, swimming, tai chi, recreational biking, or using an elliptical machine or a stationary bike are all good choices. Avoid contact sports, weightlifting and other activities that increase your risk of injury. Minimize stress on your hips, knees and ankles.
  • Rest your jaw. To protect your jaw joint, avoid chewing gum, hard rolls and ice. Take breaks during dental work to close your mouth.
  • Wear supportive shoes. To help prevent ankle sprains, wear laced boots with good arch support.
  • Improve sleep. Body pillows and super-dense foam mattresses can provide support and cushioning for painful joints. Sleeping on your side may also help.

Coping and support

Coping with a lifelong illness is challenging. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, you may face challenges at home, at work and in your relationships with others. Here are some suggestions that may help you cope:

  • Increase your knowledge. Knowing more about Ehlers-Danlos syndrome can help you take control of your condition. Find a doctor who's experienced in the management of this disorder.
  • Tell others. Explain your condition to family members, friends and your employer. Ask your employer about any accommodations that you feel will make you a more productive worker.
  • Build a support system. Cultivate relationships with family and friends who are positive and caring. It also may help to talk to a counselor or clergy member. Support groups, either online or in person, help people share common experiences and potential solutions to problems.

Helping your child cope

If you are a parent of a child with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, consider these suggestions to help your child:

  • Maintain normalcy. Treat your child like other children. Ask others — grandparents, aunts, uncles, teachers — to do the same.
  • Be open. Allow your child to express his or her feelings about having Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, even if it means being angry at times. Make sure your child's teachers and other caregivers know about your child's condition. Review with them appropriate caregiving skills, particularly in the event of a fall or injury.
  • Promote safe activity. Encourage your child to participate in physical activities with appropriate boundaries. Discourage contact sports while encouraging non-weight-bearing activities, such as swimming. Your child's doctor or physical therapist also may have recommendations.

Preparing for your appointment

You might first bring your concerns to the attention of your family doctor, but he or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in genetic diseases.

What you can do

Before your appointment, you may want to write a list of answers to the following questions:

  • What types of symptoms are you experiencing?
  • Have your parents, grandparents or siblings had similar symptoms?
  • Has any blood relative died of a ruptured blood vessel or organ?
  • What medications and supplements do you take regularly?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor may ask some of the following questions:

  • Are any of your joints overly flexible?
  • Is your skin extra stretchy?
  • Does your skin heal poorly after injuries?

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome care at Mayo Clinic

Oct. 16, 2020
  1. Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD). https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6322/ehlers-danlos-syndromes. Accessed Aug. 12, 2020.
  2. Ferri FF. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2021. Elsevier; 2021. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 12, 2020.
  3. Pauker SP, et al. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Aug. 12, 2020.
  4. Kliegman RM, et al. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Elsevier; 2020. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 12, 2020.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. Mayo Clinic; 2019.
  6. Pauker SP, et al. Overview of management of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Aug. 12, 2020.
  7. An educator's guide: Meeting the needs of the Ehlers-Danlos child. Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation. https://ehlers-danlos.com/resource-guides. Accessed Aug. 12, 2020.
  8. Deyle DR (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic. Sept. 22, 2020.
  9. Morrow ES Jr. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic. Aug. 12, 2020.

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