Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

More information about billing and insurance:

Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota

Mayo Clinic Health System

Oct. 30, 2019
  1. Congenital anomalies. World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs370/en/. Accessed Feb. 8, 2018.
  2. Birth defects. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/data.html. Accessed Feb. 8, 2018.
  3. Srinivasan S, et al. Overview of fetal arrhythmias. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2008;20:522.
  4. Brennand J, et al. Fetal anaemia: Diagnosis and management. Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2008;22:15.
  5. Kalyani R, et al. Twin reversed arterial perfusion syndrome (TRAP or acardiac twin): A case report. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2014;8:166.
  6. Djaafri F, et al. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome: What we have learned from clinical trials. Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2017;22:367.
  7. D'Antonio F, et al. Prenatal risk factors and outcomes in gastroschisis: A meta-analysis. Pediatrics. 2015;136: e159. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/136/1/e159. Accessed Feb. 8, 2018.
  8. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), single marker screen, maternal, serum. Mayo Medical Laboratories. https://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/clinical+and+interpretive/81169. Accessed Feb. 8, 2018.
  9. AskMayoExpert. Prenatal screening and testing. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  10. Screening for fetal anomalies. National Institutes of Health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0009593/. Accessed Feb. 9, 2018.
  11. Baer RJ, et al. 311: Risk of preterm birth by subtype of infants with gastroschisis. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2017;216:S190.
  12. Wyllie R, et al., eds. Abnormal rotation and fixation of the intestine. In: Pediatric Gastrointestinal and Liver disease. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 12, 2018.
  13. Lee H, et al. Efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for twin-reversed arterial perfusion sequence. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2007;196:e1.
  14. Wee LY, et al. The twin-twin transfusion syndrome. Seminars in Neonatology. 2002;7:187.
  15. Ruano R (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 13, 2018.
  16. Famuyide AO (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 1, 2018.
  17. Magtibay PM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. March 1, 2018.
  18. Amanda Ullom [contact for obstetrics and gynecology volumes]. MSS (Mayo Scheduling System). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 27, 2018.