Overview

Robotic surgery, or robot-assisted surgery, allows doctors to perform many types of complex procedures with more precision, flexibility and control than is possible with conventional techniques. Robotic surgery is usually associated with minimally invasive surgery — procedures performed through tiny incisions. It is also sometimes used in certain traditional open surgical procedures.

About robotic surgery

Robotic surgery with the da Vinci Surgical System was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2000. The technique has been rapidly adopted by hospitals in the United States and Europe for use in the treatment of a wide range of conditions.

The most widely used clinical robotic surgical system includes a camera arm and mechanical arms with surgical instruments attached to them. The surgeon controls the arms while seated at a computer console near the operating table. The console gives the surgeon a high-definition, magnified, 3-D view of the surgical site. The surgeon leads other team members who assist during the operation.

Why it's done

Advantages

Surgeons who use the robotic system find that for many procedures it enhances precision, flexibility and control during the operation and allows them to better see the site, compared with traditional techniques. Using robotic surgery, surgeons can perform delicate and complex procedures that may have been difficult or impossible with other methods.

Often, robotic surgery makes minimally invasive surgery possible. The benefits of minimally invasive surgery include:

  • Fewer complications, such as surgical site infection
  • Less pain and blood loss
  • Quicker recovery
  • Smaller, less noticeable scars

Risks

Robotic surgery involves risk, some of which may be similar to those of conventional open surgery, such as a small risk of infection and other complications.

Is robotic surgery right for you?

Robotic surgery isn't an option for everyone. Talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks of robotic surgery and how it compares with other techniques, such as other types of minimally invasive surgery and conventional open surgery.

Robotic surgery may not be available at medical centers in your geographic location.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Robotic surgery care at Mayo Clinic

Feb. 10, 2018
References
  1. Paraiso MFR, et al. Robot-assisted laparoscopy. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Dec. 5, 2017.
  2. Bishop JT, et al. Laparoscopic/robotic camera and lens systems. In: Atlas of Laparoscopic and Robotic Urologic Surgery. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 5, 2017.
  3. Khosla A, et al. Robotic surgery of the kidney, bladder, and prostate. Surgical Clinics of North America. 2016;96:615.
  4. FDA clears new robotically-assisted surgical device for adult patients. U.S. Food & Drug Administration. https://www.fda.gov/newsevents/newsroom/pressannouncements/ucm580452.htm. Accessed Dec. 19, 2017.
  5. Do robotic surgical systems improve profit margins? A cross-sectional analysis of California hospitals. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1098301517302589?via=ihub. Accessed Dec. 19, 2017.
  6. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 12, 2017.
  7. Frank, Igor MD (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 8, 2018.
  8. Wilkinson, JM MD (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 8, 2018.