Results

After you complete chemotherapy treatment, your doctor will schedule follow-up visits — usually every four to six months at first and then less frequently the longer you remain cancer-free. This is to monitor you for long-term side effects and to check for recurrence of the breast cancer. Make a list of questions you want to ask your doctor or nurse.

Your doctor will perform a physical exam, including a breast exam, and ask you about any new symptoms you're experiencing.

You will undergo yearly mammograms as part of your follow-up. Other tests, such as tumor marker tests, liver function tests, PET scans, CT scans, bone scans and chest X-rays, generally aren't recommended unless there is a specific need. Additional imaging tests are typically needed only when a recurrence is suspected or new symptoms or physical exam findings warrant.

Nov. 15, 2017
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