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Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

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Displaying 1-2 out of 2 doctors available

Last Name Initial: H

  1. Christian Hanna, M.D., M.S.

    Christian Hanna, M.D., M.S.

    1. Pediatric Nephrologist
    1. Rochester, MN
    Areas of focus:

    Continuous renal replacement therapy, Peritoneal dialysis, Kidney transplant, Kidney biopsy, Dialysis, Hemodialysis, Ho...rseshoe kidney, Membranous nephropathy, Medullary sponge kidney, Kidney infection, Protein in urine, Acute kidney injury , Minimal change disease, Kidney stone, Blood in urine, Multicystic kidney dysplasia, UTI, High blood pressure in children, Chronic kidney disease, Glomerular disease, Renal tubular acidosis, Polycystic kidney disease, Congenital kidney disorder, Kidney cyst, Postural proteinuria, Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, Renovascular disease, Hemolytic uremic syndrome, Nephrotic syndrome, Renal artery stenosis, Hydronephrosis, Single kidney, Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, Inherited cystic kidney disorder, Childhood nephrotic syndrome, IgA nephropathy

  2. Marie C. Hogan, M.D., Ph.D.

    Marie C. Hogan, M.D., Ph.D.

    1. Nephrologist
    2. Internist
    1. Rochester, MN
    Areas of focus:

    Polycystic kidney disease, Glomerular disease, Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

Research

Mayo Clinic is a leader in polycystic kidney disease research. Mayo Clinic researchers discovered:

  • The main gene that causes autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD)
  • The gene that causes autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD)
  • A gene that causes a rare form of polycystic kidney disease associated with multiple malformations (Meckel-Gruber syndrome)
  • The polycystic kidney disease proteins polycystin 1, polycystin 2 and fibrocystin
  • The polycystic kidney and liver disease gene GANAB
  • Other genes that cause kidney cyst disease, such as DNAJB11
  • A way to use CT and MRI scans to classify polycystic kidney disease and select people for clinical trials of new therapies

Lab-based research at Mayo Clinic has focused on:

  • Explaining how mutations in the polycystic kidney disease genes lead to cyst development
  • Preclinical studies in drug therapies for polycystic kidney disease, such as octreotide and vasopressin antagonists
  • Finding effective therapies for polycystic kidney disease and liver disease
  • Improving imaging assessments of polycystic kidney and liver disease
  • Studies of polycystic kidney disease proteins in urine particles known as exosomes
  • Testing new compounds in animal models of polycystic kidney disease
  • Studies of the hairlike structures (primary cilia) implicated in polycystic kidney disease

Mayo research has shown that a new drug (tolvaptan) can dramatically slow the development and progression of polycystic kidney disease in animal models.

Mayo researchers have also shown that another drug (octreotide) delays the development of both polycystic kidney disease and polycystic liver disease and is a potential treatment option for people with liver involvement.

These medications are now in clinical trials and tolvaptan is approved for use in some countries for polycystic kidney disease. In addition, nephrologists at Mayo Clinic are working to understand how to prevent the progression of kidney (renal) disease in patients with polycystic kidney disease.

Read more about the extensive research being done at Mayo Clinic's Robert M. and Billie Kelley Pirnie Translational Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) Center.

The Mayo Nephrology Collaborative Group ― a consortium of nephrologists located across the United States ― develops and conducts studies aimed at improving treatment of patients with renal diseases, including polycystic kidney disease.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on polycystic kidney disease on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Research Profiles

Polycystic kidney disease care at Mayo Clinic

Aug. 11, 2020