Departments and specialties

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

Departments that treat this condition

Areas that research this condition

Research

Mayo Clinic doctors are conducting clinical trials of new ways to diagnose and treat gastroparesis. Researchers in the Enteric Neuroscience Program are studying the underlying mechanics of the digestive system, including nerve reflexes between the stomach and brain, as well as new methods of gastric biopsy to better understand the underlying causes of gastroparesis. Mayo researchers are also studying new therapies for diabetic gastroparesis.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on gastroparesis on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Research Profiles

Gastroparesis care at Mayo Clinic

June 16, 2017
References
  1. Feldman M, et al. Gastric neuromuscular function and neuromuscular disorders. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 7, 2016.
  2. Gastroparesis. The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/gastroparesis/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed Nov. 7, 2016.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Gastroparesis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  4. Camilleri M. lGastroparesis: Etiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2016.
  5. Bharucha AE. Epidemiology and natural history of gastroparesis. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America. 2015;44:9.
  6. Clinical guideline: Management of gastroparesis. Bethesda, Md.: American College of Gastroenterology. http://gi.org/guideline/management-of-gastroparesis/. Accessed Nov. 6, 2016.
  7. Bouras EP, et al. Gastroparesis: From concepts to management. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2013;28:437.
  8. Parrish CR. Nutritional considerations in the patient with gastroparesis. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America. 2015;44:83.
  9. Camilleri M. Treatment of gastroparesis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2016.
  10. Lembo A, et al. Relamorelin reduces vomiting frequency and severity and accelerates gastric emptying in adults with diabetic gastroparesis. Gastroenterology. 2016;151:87.
  11. Camilleri M. Novel diet, drugs, and gastric interventions for gastroparesis. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2016;14:1072.
  12. Hasler WL. Electrical stimulation for gastroparesis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2016.
  13. Stein BJ, et al. Gastroparesis: A review of current diagnosis and treatment options. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 2015;49:550.
  14. Parkman HP. Idiopathic gastroenterology. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America. 2015;44:59.
  15. Levinthal DJ, et al. Systematic review and meta-analysis: Gastric electrical stimulation for gastroparesis. Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical. In press. Accessed Nov. 6, 2016.
  16. Lal Nikhil, et al. Gastric electrical stimulation with the Enterra System: A systematic review. Gastroenterology Research and Practice. 2015;2015:1.
  17. Lee LA, et al. Complementary and alternative medicine for gastroparesis. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America. 2015;44:137.
  18. Pasricha PJ, et al.Outcomes and factors associated with reduced symptoms in patients with gastroparesis. Gastroenterology. 2015;149:1762.
  19. Brown A. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 11, 2016.