Depression care at Mayo Clinic

  • Expertise and experience. Experienced professionals in the Department of Psychiatry and Psychology treat thousands of people with depression each year. Specialists in psychiatry and psychology services and other areas as needed work with you to set personalized treatment goals and monitor your progress.
  • Pediatric specialists. Pediatric specialists in psychiatry and psychology services at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota work closely with you and your child, and other areas as needed, to create a personalized treatment plan. The Mayo Clinic Depression Center in Minnesota offers the Pediatric Mood Clinic and the Child and Adolescent Integrated Mood Program (CAIMP), a two-week outpatient partial hospitalization program for children and teens (ages 8 to 18) with primary depression or bipolar disorder.
  • Latest diagnostic and treatment options. Getting the right medications for your needs is crucial. Your treatment may include antidepressants, psychotherapy or other therapies. In consultation, Mayo providers may offer genetic tests to help determine how your body is processing various antidepressant drugs. Doctors will work with you to carefully monitor medications.
  • Treatment for complicated depression. Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota offers the Mayo Clinic Depression Center. This center includes a comprehensive outpatient evaluation and treatment program, the Mood Disorders Unit that provides inpatient treatment to adults whose depression or bipolar disorder significantly affects functioning or safety, and the Mayo Mood Clinic, an outpatient program that evaluates and treats adults who have treatment-resistant depression or bipolar disorder.

Expertise and rankings

Mayo Clinic offers:

  • Expertise and teamwork. National leaders in the treatment of depression, specialists in the Department of Psychiatry and Psychology lead a team of experienced and dedicated professionals who will work with you to set personalized treatment goals and monitor your progress.
  • Pediatric experts. At Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota, child and adolescent psychiatrists work with doctors in other specialties, as needed, to do a comprehensive evaluation and develop a treatment plan specifically geared toward your child's needs. When your child leaves Mayo Clinic, Mayo can consult with your hometown doctor to adjust the treatment plan as needed.
  • Cutting-edge research. Mayo Clinic scientists conduct research and clinical trials to improve the diagnosis and treatment of depression in children and adults. Mayo is a leader in pharmacogenomics research, the study of how genetic factors can predict a person's response to a medication.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Aug. 16, 2017
References
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  10. Depression and complementary health approaches: What the science says. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/providers/digest/depression-science. Accessed Jan. 23, 2017.
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  13. The road to resilience. American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx. Accessed Jan. 23, 2017.
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  17. Bipolar and related disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: American Psychiatric Association; 2013. http://www.psychiatryonline.org. Accessed Jan. 23, 2017.
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