Cerebral palsy care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Mayo Clinic neurologists, pediatric neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists as well as other health care professionals work together to diagnose and treat children and adults with cerebral palsy. Doctors collaborate with therapists, nurses, dietitians, physical and occupational therapists, nurses, social workers, and others trained to help people overcome limitations and make the most of their capabilities.

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

Mayo Clinic doctors use the most current imaging tests to accurately diagnose cerebral palsy. Tests may include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cranial ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), electroencephalogram (EEG), and others.

Experience

Mayo Clinic doctors have significant experience treating cerebral palsy. Mayo Clinic doctors evaluate and treat more than 800 children and adults with cerebral palsy each year.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic doctors have deep expertise treating cerebral palsy and the movement problems and other disorders that often accompany the condition.

Research

Mayo Clinic doctors study potential diagnosis and treatment options for cerebral palsy and conduct active research into diagnostic methods and treatment therapies.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., are ranked among the Best Hospitals and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., is ranked highly performing for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery and for orthopedics.

Mayo Clinic Children’s Center has again been ranked as the top performing children’s hospital in Minnesota, the Dakotas and Iowa on U.S. News & World Report’s 2017–2018 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.

Expertise and rankings

To ensure the best possible health and development outcome, a child with cerebral palsy is likely to need coordinated care by a number of doctors in various specialties during the growing years. As your child grows to adulthood, Mayo Clinic can provide a smooth transition from pediatric care to coordinated medical care with adult care doctors.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., are ranked among the Best Hospitals and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., is ranked highly performing for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery and for orthopedics.

Mayo Clinic Children’s Center has again been ranked as the top performing children’s hospital in Minnesota, the Dakotas and Iowa on U.S. News & World Report’s 2017–2018 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Aug. 25, 2016
References
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