Diagnosis

Tests and procedures used to diagnose pseudomembranous colitis and to search for complications include:

  • Stool sample. There are a number of different stool sample tests used to detect C. difficile infection of the colon.
  • Blood tests. These may reveal an abnormally high white blood cell count (leukocytosis), which may indicate pseudomembranous colitis.
  • Colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy. In both of these tests, your doctor uses a tube with a miniature camera at its tip to examine the inside of your colon for signs of pseudomembranous colitis — raised, yellow plaques (lesions), as well as swelling.
  • Imaging tests. If you have severe symptoms, your doctor may obtain an abdominal X-ray or an abdominal CT scan to look for complications such as toxic megacolon or colon rupture.
Jan. 08, 2016
References
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  2. Clostridium difficile-induced diarrhea. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/infectious-diseases/anaerobic-bacteria/i-clostridium-difficile-i-induced-diarrhea. Accessed Oct. 8, 2015.
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  10. Davidson LE, et al. Clostridium difficile and probiotics. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Oct. 5, 2015.
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