Mayo Clinic's approach

Teamwork

Pancreas transplant consultation at Mayo Clinic Pancreas transplant consultation

Pancreas transplant consultation at Mayo Clinic

At Mayo Clinic, an integrated team of doctors trained in endocrinology (endocrinologists), abdominal transplant surgery, infectious disease management and other specialties is focused on your needs and the needs of your family before, during and after your pancreas transplant.

Surgeons, doctors, transplant nurses, pharmacists, social workers and others work together to manage every aspect of your pancreas transplant, from planning through post-surgical care.

Coordinated care

Care team roles Care team roles

Health care professionals trained in many medical specialties work together as a team to ensure favorable outcomes from your pancreas transplant.

Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not getting just one opinion — your care is discussed among the team, your test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and your transplant care team works together to determine what's best for you.

Surgical expertise

Mayo Clinic surgeons have performed hundreds of successful pancreas transplants using state-of-the-art technology since 1987. Across three campuses in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona, Mayo Clinic's expert transplant teams perform approximately 45 pancreas transplants a year.

Mayo Clinic is one of only a few transplant centers that offer pancreas transplants to select candidates with type 2 diabetes and treated HIV.

Pancreas transplant surgery is also provided to children at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minnesota.

Research

At Mayo Clinic, you may have access to clinical trials, research studies and new treatments as part of your care.

Researchers in the Mayo Clinic Transplant Center are actively engaged in developing new technologies, treatments and techniques to make transplants safer and available to more people.

For example, researchers at Mayo Clinic are developing an artificial pancreas that could significantly improve the quality of life for people with type 1 diabetes and potentially provide an alternative to pancreas transplant.

Mayo Clinic researchers are also investigating ways to lower the rejection risk among transplant recipients and seeking new ways to treat people who need transplants of all types.

Read more about the Pancreas Transplant Program at Mayo Clinic.

Lowering rejection in organ transplant

Watch Mark Stegall, M.D., and Richard Daly, M.D., discuss lowering rejection risk in organ transplants.

The Mayo Clinic experience and patient stories

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

Expertise and rankings

Experience

Pancreas transplant teamwork at Mayo Clinic Pancreas transplant teamwork at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest transplant practices in the United States. Across its three sites in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona, Mayo Clinic has performed hundreds of successful pancreas transplants, averaging approximately 45 pancreas transplants each year.

Mayo Clinic is one of only a few transplant centers that offers pancreas transplants to select candidates with type 2 diabetes and treated HIV.

Pancreas transplant outcomes at Mayo Clinic compare favorably with the national average.

Innovation and research

Mayo Clinic surgeons have extensive expertise in many areas of pancreas transplantation, including pancreas-only, simultaneous pancreas-kidney and pancreas-after-kidney transplant.

The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies and pancreas transplant research. Mayo Clinic doctors actively research pancreas transplantation techniques and treatment options, presenting their work at national and international meetings.

For example, researchers at Mayo Clinic are developing an artificial pancreas that could significantly improve the quality of life for people with type 1 diabetes and potentially provide an alternative to pancreas transplant.

Artificial Pancreas Lab at Mayo Clinic. Artificial Pancreas Lab

Mayo Clinic researchers are also investigating ways to lower the rejection risk among transplant recipients and seeking new ways to treat people who need transplants of all types.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for diabetes and endocrinology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., is ranked highly performing for diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report.

Read more about the Pancreas Transplant Program at Mayo Clinic.

Volumes and outcomes

 

Mayo Clinic's experienced doctors and integrated team approach result in transplant outcomes that compare favorably with national averages. Teams work with transplant recipients before, during and after surgery to ensure the greatest likelihood of superior results.

Volumes and statistics are maintained separately for the three Mayo Clinic locations. Taken together or separately, Mayo Clinic's transplant results are excellent.

Pancreas transplant volumes and statistics

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic has dedicated transplant financial services representatives and social workers who can assist you with insurance and financial questions regarding your pancreas transplant.

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. Many insurance companies require you to get preapproval authorization prior to transplant services.

Read more about pancreas transplant costs and insurance at Mayo Clinic.

More information about billing and insurance:

Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota

Mayo Clinic Health System

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Aug. 20, 2019
References
  1. Alhamad T, et al. Pancreas-kidney transplantation in diabetes mellitus: Patient selection and pretransplant evaluation. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed April 21, 2019.
  2. Alhamad T, et al. Pancreas-kidney transplantation: Benefits and complications. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed April 21, 2019.
  3. Pancreatic islet transplantation. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/insulin-medicines-treatments/pancreatic-islet-transplantation. Accessed April 21, 2019.
  4. Robertson RP. Pancreas and islet transplantation in diabetes mellitus. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed April 21, 2019.
  5. Becker Y, et al. Getting a new pancreas: Facts about pancreas transplants. American Society of Transplantation. https://www.myast.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/Patient_Education/08_AST-18-EB-Getting-A-New-Pancreas_FINAL.pdf. Accessed April 21, 2019.
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  7. Kidney-pancreas transplant. National Kidney Foundation. http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/kidpantx.cfm. Accessed April 21, 2019.
  8. Care after kidney transplant. National Kidney Foundation. https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/immunosuppression. Accessed April 22, 2019.
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  10. Side effects. UNOS Transplant Living. http://transplantliving.org/after-the-transplant/medications/side-effects/. Accessed April 22, 2019.
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  12. Pancreas. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/data/organ-datasource/pancreas/. Accessed April 22, 2019.
  13. Hart A, et al. OPTN/SRTR 2017 Annual Data Report: Kidney. American Journal of Transplantation. 2019;19(suppl 2):19.
  14. Alhamad T, et al. Pancreas-kidney transplantation in diabetes mellitus. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed April 22, 2019.
  15. Husain SA, et al. Patients prioritize waitlist over posttransplant outcomes when evaluating kidney transplant centers. American Journal of Transplantation. 2018;18;2781.
  16. Pancreas. UNOS Transplant Living. https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/data/organ-datasource/pancreas/ Accessed April 22, 2019.
  17. Why join a support group. UNOS Transplant Living. https://transplantliving.org/community/support-groups/. Accessed April 22, 2019.
  18. Frequently asked questions. UNOS Transplant Living. https://transplantliving.org/after-the-transplant/frequently-asked-questions/. Accessed April 22, 2019.
  19. Pancreas transplant. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. http://www.srtr.org. Accessed April 22, 2019.
  20. Dingli D (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 29, 2019.