Precautions

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

It is very important that your doctor check you closely to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood and urine tests are needed to check for unwanted effects.

Do not use this medicine together with non-selective MAO inhibitors [eg, isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), tranylcypromine (Parnate®)]. Using these medicines together may increase your risk for more serious side effects.

This medicine may cause dizziness, fainting, or fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat, especially when used together with dobutamine, dopamine, epinephrine, isoproterenol, or norepinephrine. Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns.

This medicine may make you drowsy and less alert than you are normally. Do not drive or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how this medicine affects you.

This medicine may cause uncontrolled sudden movements (dyskinesia) or make such movements you already have worse or more frequent. Tell your doctor if this happens.

If you develop any unusual or strange thoughts and behavior while using this medicine, be sure to discuss it with your doctor. Other changes might be confusion, delusion (believing things that are not real), hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there), getting paranoid, suicidal thoughts, and unusual excitement, nervousness, or irritability.

Some people who have used this medicine had unusual changes in their behavior. Talk with your doctor right away if you start having problems with gambling or an increased interest in sex while using this medicine.

Do not stop using this medicine or change your dose without first checking with your doctor. Stopping this medicine suddenly may cause fever, confusion, or severe muscle stiffness.

Check with your doctor before using this medicine with alcohol or other medicines that affect the central nervous system (CNS). The use of alcohol or other medicines that affect the CNS with opicapone may worsen the side effects of this medicine, such as dizziness, poor concentration, drowsiness, unusual dreams, and trouble with sleeping. Some examples of medicines that affect the CNS are antihistamines or medicine for allergies or colds, sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicines, medicine for depression, medicine for anxiety, prescription pain medicine or narcotics, medicine for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, medicine for seizures or barbiturates, muscle relaxants, or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.