Diagnosis

Your doctor may use some of the following methods to determine if you have dumping syndrome.

  • Medical history and evaluation. Your doctor can often diagnose dumping syndrome by taking a medical history, particularly if you've had stomach surgery, and evaluating your signs and symptoms.
  • Blood sugar test. Because low blood sugar is sometimes associated with dumping syndrome, your doctor may order a test (oral glucose tolerance test) to measure your blood sugar level at the peak time of your symptoms to help confirm the diagnosis.
  • Gastric emptying test. A radioactive material is added to food to measure how quickly food moves through your stomach.

Treatment

Early dumping syndrome is likely to resolve on its own within three months. In the meantime, there's a good chance that diet changes will ease your symptoms. If not, your doctor may recommend medications or surgery.

Medications

For people with severe signs and symptoms unrelieved by dietary changes, doctors prescribe octreotide (Sandostatin) in rare cases. This anti-diarrheal drug, taken by injection under your skin (subcutaneously), can slow the emptying of food into the intestine. Possible side effects include nausea, vomiting and stomach upset.

Talk with your doctor about the proper way to self-administer the drug.

Surgery

Doctors use a number of surgical procedures to treat difficult cases of dumping syndrome that are resistant to more conservative approaches. Most of these operations are reconstructive techniques, such as reconstructing the pylorus, or they're intended to reverse gastric bypass surgery.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Here are some dietary strategies that can help maintain good nutrition and minimize your symptoms.

  • Eat smaller meals. Try eating five or six small meals a day rather than three larger ones.
  • Avoid fluids with meals. Drink liquids only between meals. Avoid liquids for a half-hour before eating and a half-hour after eating.
  • Change your diet. Eat more protein — meat, poultry, creamy peanut butter and fish — and complex carbohydrates — oatmeal and other whole-grain foods high in fiber. Limit high-sugar foods, such as candy, table sugar, syrup, sodas and juices.

    The natural sugar in dairy products (lactose) might worsen your symptoms. Try small amounts at first, or eliminate them if you think they're causing problems. You might want to see a registered dietitian for more advice about what to eat.

  • Chew well. Chewing food thoroughly before you swallow can aid digestion.
  • Sit upright after eating. Don't lie down for 30 to 60 minutes after you eat.
  • Increase fiber intake. Psyllium, guar gum and pectin in food or supplements can delay the absorption of carbohydrates in the small intestine.
  • Check with your doctor about drinking alcohol.
  • Consume adequate vitamins, iron and calcium. These can sometimes become depleted following stomach surgery. Talk to your doctor or dietician about whether you need supplements.

Alternative medicine

Some people use supplements such as pectin, guar gum, black psyllium and blond psyllium to thicken the digestive contents and slow its progress through the intestines. If you decide to try a supplement, discuss it with your doctor to learn about any potential side effects or interactions with other medications you're taking.

Preparing for your appointment

If you have signs and symptoms of dumping syndrome, you're likely to first see your family doctor or a general practitioner. You may then be referred to a doctor who specializes in treating digestive system disorders (gastroenterologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

  • Be aware of pre-appointment restrictions. When you make the appointment, ask if there's anything you need to do beforehand, such as restrict your diet.
  • Write down your symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment.
  • Write down key personal information, including major stresses or recent life changes.
  • List all medications, vitamins or supplements you take.
  • Take a family member or friend along to help you remember everything.
  • Bring your medical records about past treatment, especially stomach surgery.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask your doctor

For dumping syndrome, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What is likely causing my symptoms?
  • What are other possible causes?
  • What tests do I need?
  • What is the best course of action?
  • Should I see a dietitian?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Should I see a specialist?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material that I can take? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you questions, including:

  • Have you had stomach surgery, and if so, what kind?
  • When did your symptoms begin?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • How long after eating do your symptoms begin?
  • Do certain foods make your symptoms worse?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
June 10, 2015
References
  1. Dumping syndrome. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/dumping-syndrome/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed Feb. 26, 2015.
  2. Adair JD, et al. Late complications of bariatric surgical operations. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 26, 2015.
  3. Elrazek AE, et al. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines. World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2014;6:220.
  4. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Dietary guidelines for managing dumping syndrome. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  5. Yeo CJ. Postgastrectomy syndromes. In: Shackelford's Surgery of the Alimentary Tract. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2013. http:// www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  6. Goldman L, et al. Disorders of gastrointestinal motility. In: Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  7. Guar gum. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://www.naturaldatabase.com. March 2, 2015.
  8. Pectin. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://www.naturaldatabase.com. March 2, 2015.
  9. Blond psyllium. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://www.naturaldatabase.com. March 2, 2015.
  10. Black psyllium. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://www.naturaldatabase.com. March 2, 2015.