Overview

Lymphoma consultation at Mayo Clinic

CAR-T cell therapy treatment overview

Mayo Clinic's CAR-T Cell Therapy Program is one of a very few such programs at select medical centers with experts trained and certified to manage this promising area of cancer treatment.

Click here to learn more about the steps of CAR-T cell therapy treatment

The Mayo Clinic CAR-T Cell Therapy Program is one of a few such landmark programs at select medical centers, with experts trained and certified to manage CAR-T cell therapy. Mayo Clinic was one of the centers that treated people as part of the clinical trial that led to FDA approval of CAR-T cell therapy.

CAR-T cell therapy may be a treatment option for:

  • Relapsed, refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia
  • Relapsed, refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Other types of cancer and medical conditions undergoing clinical studies

If you are eligible for CAR-T cell therapy at Mayo Clinic and scheduled for this treatment, you will undergo a process that takes many weeks.

Appointments. You will have many appointments and tests before and after CAR-T cell therapy. Depending on where you live, you may need to be away from home for periods of time throughout the CAR-T cell therapy process.

Caregivers. At least one other person should come with you to all of your appointments. A caregiver needs to stay with you 24 hours a day when you are not staying in the hospital during chemotherapy, infusion and care after infusion.

Treatment plan. Ongoing care may be needed for months to years after CAR-T cell therapy. During the CAR-T cell therapy process, your health may change in a way that infusing CAR-T cells may no longer be an option.

Oct. 23, 2018
References
  1. Locke FL, et al. Clinical and biologic covariates of outcomes in zuma-1: A pivotal trial of axicabtagene ciloleucel (AXI-CEL; KTE-C19) in patients with refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Presentation. 2017 annual meeting of European Hematology Association, June 24, 2017, Madrid, Spain. https://learningcenter.ehaweb.org/eha/2017/22nd/181753/yi.lin.clinical.and.biologic.covariates.of.outcomes.in.zuma-1.a.pivotal.trial.html?f=m3. Accessed Oct. 27, 2017.
  2. Neelapu SS, et al. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy: Assessment and management of toxicities. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology. 2018;15:47.