Overview

Psoriatic arthritis is a form of arthritis that affects some people who have psoriasis — a condition that features red patches of skin topped with silvery scales. Most people develop psoriasis first and are later diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, but the joint problems can sometimes begin before skin lesions appear.

Joint pain, stiffness and swelling are the main symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. They can affect any part of your body, including your fingertips and spine, and can range from relatively mild to severe. In both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, disease flares may alternate with periods of remission.

No cure for psoriatic arthritis exists, so the focus is on controlling symptoms and preventing damage to your joints. Without treatment, psoriatic arthritis may be disabling.

Oct. 27, 2016
References
  1. Psoriatic arthritis overview. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/psoriatic_arthritis/default.asp. Accessed June 28, 2016.
  2. Firestein GS, et al. Psoriatic arthritis. In: Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 28, 2016.
  3. Ferri FF. Psoriatic arthritis. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 28, 2016.
  4. Gladman DD, et al. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 6, 2016.
  5. Gladman DD, et al. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 6, 2016.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Psoriatic arthritis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.