Treatment

The goal of treatment is to relieve your pain and stiffness, and prevent or delay complications and spinal deformity. Ankylosing spondylitis treatment is most successful before the disease causes irreversible damage to your joints.

Medications

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — such as naproxen (Naprosyn) and indomethacin (Indocin) — are the medications doctors most commonly use to treat ankylosing spondylitis. They can relieve your inflammation, pain and stiffness. However, these medications might cause gastrointestinal bleeding.

If NSAIDs aren't helpful, your doctor might suggest starting a biologic medication, such as a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker or an interleukin 17 (IL-17) inhibitor. TNF blockers target a cell protein that causes inflammation in the body. IL-17 plays a role in your body's defense against infection and also has a role in inflammation.

TNF blockers help reduce pain, stiffness, and tender or swollen joints. They are administered by injecting the medication under the skin or through an intravenous line.

The five TNF blockers approved by the Food & Drug Administration to treat ankylosing spondylitis are:

  • Adalimumab (Humira)
  • Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia)
  • Etanercept (Enbrel)
  • Golimumab (Simponi; Simponi Aria)
  • Infliximab (Remicade)

Secukinumab (Cosentyx) is the first IL-17 inhibitor approved by the FDA for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

TNF blockers and IL-17 inhibitors can reactivate latent tuberculosis and make you more prone to infection.

Therapy

Physical therapy is an important part of treatment and can provide a number of benefits, from pain relief to improved strength and flexibility. A physical therapist can design specific exercises for your needs.

Range-of-motion and stretching exercises can help maintain flexibility in your joints and preserve good posture. Proper sleep and walking positions and abdominal and back exercises can help maintain your upright posture.

Surgery

Most people with ankylosing spondylitis don't need surgery. However, your doctor might recommend surgery if you have severe pain or joint damage, or if your hip joint is so damaged that it needs to be replaced.

Nov. 01, 2016
References
  1. Ankylosing spondylitis. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Ankylosing_Spondylitis. Accessed Aug. 25, 2016.
  2. Yu DT, et al. Clinical manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 25, 2016.
  3. Yu DT. Assessment and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 25, 2016.
  4. Overview of ankylosing spondylitis. Spondylitis Association of America. http://www.spondylitis.org/Learn-About-Spondylitis/Ankylosing-Spondylitis. Accessed Aug. 25, 2016.
  5. Ward MM, et al. American College of Rheumatology/Spondylitis Association of America/Spondyloarthritis Research and Treatment Network 2015 recommendations for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis. Arthritis Care & Research. 2016;68:151.