Mayo Clinic's approach

Laparoscopic nephrectomy procedure at Mayo Clinic Laparoscopic nephrectomy procedure at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic surgeons perform minimally invasive surgery to remove a living donor's kidney (laparoscopic nephrectomy).

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  • Team approach. Mayo Clinic's integrated teams of surgeons, doctors, transplant nurses, pharmacists and others work together to provide your care, from your evaluation through post-surgery care. After you donate an organ, living-donor coordinators and other transplant staff members will offer you support and follow-up care for several months after your surgery.
  • Coordinated care. Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion — your care is discussed among the team, your test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and your transplant care team works together to determine what's best for you.
  • Surgical expertise. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform minimally invasive surgery to remove a living donor's kidney (laparoscopic nephrectomy) for a kidney transplant, which is less painful and has a shorter recovery time for the donor.

    Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including numerous complex surgical procedures at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. As a three-site institution, Mayo Clinic has one of the largest living-donor kidney transplant and paired-kidney donor programs in the United States.

  • Research. Mayo Clinic researchers actively study the health of donors after transplant surgery to improve results. At Mayo Clinic, you may have access to ongoing clinical trials, research and new treatments as part of your living-donor transplantation experience.
Care team roles Care team roles

Health care professionals trained in many medical specialties work together as a team to ensure a favorable outcome for your donor nephrectomy.

    Altruistic kidney donor shares his experience

    Expertise and rankings

    Donor nephrectomy consultation at Mayo Clinic

    Mayo Clinic has one of the largest living-donor kidney transplant programs in the U.S.

    Experience

    As a three-site institution, Mayo Clinic has one of the largest living-donor kidney transplant programs in the United States. At its campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, Mayo Clinic performs about 250 living-donor laparoscopic nephrectomies and more than 600 kidney transplants each year, including numerous complex surgical procedures.

    Mayo Clinic kidney transplant surgeons have performed more than 7,000 procedures using state-of-the-art technology since performing their first kidney transplant in 1963.

    The Mayo Clinic kidney transplant team has extensive experience in the most complex types of kidney transplantation, including ABO incompatible, positive crossmatch and paired exchange kidney transplants.

    Advanced treatment and technology

    Mayo Clinic surgeons have extensive expertise with all types of living-donor transplant surgeries, including minimally invasive procedures, HIV-positive organ donation, paired-organ donation and other complex procedures.

    Innovation and research

    Mayo Clinic transplant researchers take a leading role in efforts to find new, improved ways to conduct all aspects of transplantation, expanding the availability of transplants, reducing risks and improving the outcomes of transplantation.

    Our experts have pioneered many procedures, including living-donor kidney transplants and kidney transplant before dialysis is needed.

    The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for kidney transplant and living-donor research.

    Nationally recognized expertise

    Kidney transplant outcomes at Mayo Clinic compare favorably with the national average.

    Locations, travel and lodging

    Mayo Clinic Transplant Center offers care and housing for transplant patients and their families in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

    Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

    For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

    Costs and insurance

    Living-donor frequently asked costs and insurance questions

    Learn more

    Mayo Clinic has dedicated transplant financial services representatives and social workers who can assist you with insurance and financial questions regarding your living organ donation.

    Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. Many insurance companies require you to get preapproval authorization prior to transplant services.

    For international patients

    Mayo Clinic has dedicated international patient account representatives who can assist you with questions regarding your costs and insurance. Read more about international financial services.

    Case managers

    Mayo Clinic financial staff will work closely with your case managers from your insurance company. Your case manager, who is assigned to you, is available to answer questions and calls related to your insurance costs.

    March 19, 2019
    References
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    3. Treatment methods for kidney failure: Transplantation. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/transplant/index.aspx. Accessed March 11, 2016.
    4. Making the decision. Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/being-a-living-donor/making-the-decision/. Accessed April 5, 2016.
    5. The kidneys and how they work. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/yourkidneys/index.aspx. Accessed March 11, 2016.
    6. Organ and tissue donation from living donors. U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources. http://www.organdonor.gov/about/livedonation.html. Accessed June 21, 2016.
    7. Hart A, et al. Kidney. American Journal of Transplantation. 2016;16:11.
    8. Risks. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/being-a-living-donor/risks/. Accessed March 30, 2016.
    9. AskMayoExpert. Living donor nephrectomy Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
    10. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Living kidney donor transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2012.
    11. Lentine KL, et al. Evaluation of the living kidney donor. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 20, 2016.
    12. Shapiro R, et al. Benefits and complications of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 5, 2016.
    13. What to expect after donation. National Kidney Foundation. https://www.kidney.org/transplantation/livingdonors/what-expect-after-donation. Accessed April 6, 2016.
    14. Kidney disease: Causes. National Kidney Foundation. https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/kidneydiscauses. Accessed April 7, 2016.
    15. Hays RE, et al. The independent living donor advocate: A guidance document from the American Society of Transplantation's Living Donor Community of Practice (AST LDCOP). American Journal of Transplantation. 2015;15:518.
    16. Helpful tips for living donors and caretakers. National Kidney Foundation. https://www.kidney.org/transplantation/livingdonors/infotips. Accessed June 22, 3016
    17. Selecting a hospital. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/before-the-transplant/getting-on-the-list/selecting-a-hospital/. Accessed April 5, 2016.
    18. Living kidney transplants, July 1, 2014-June 30, 2015. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. http://www.srtr.org/csr/current/Centers/TransplantCenters.aspx?organcode=KI. Accessed April 6, 2016.
    19. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 6, 2016.
    20. Kidney transplant. National Kidney Foundation. Accessed April 8, 2016.
    21. Pregnancy. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/being-a-living-donor/pregnancy/. Accessed April 6, 2016.
    22. Qualifications. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/being-a-living-donor/qualifications/. Accessed April 1, 2016.
    23. Insurance. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/financing-living-donation/insurance/. Accessed April 1, 2016.
    24. Eligibility guidelines. Arlington, Va.: National Living Donor Assistance Center. http://www.livingdonorassistance.org/potentialdonors/eligibilityguidelines.aspx. Accessed April 5, 2016.
    25. Costs. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/financing-living-donation/costs/. Accessed April 1, 2016.
    26. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 23, 2016.
    27. Shapiro, R. Deceased and living donor renal allograft recovery. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 23, 2016.
    28. Paired donation. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/types/paired-donation/. Accessed April 5, 2016.