When to see a doctor

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

  • Groin pain associated with back, abdomen or chest pain
  • Sudden, severe testicle pain
  • Testicle pain and swelling accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fever, chills or blood in the urine

Schedule a doctor's visit if you have:

  • Severe groin pain
  • Groin pain that doesn't improve with home treatment within a few days
  • Mild testicle pain lasting longer than a few days
  • A lump or swelling in or around a testicle
  • Intermittent intense pain along the lower side of your abdomen (flank) that may radiate along your groin and into your testicle
  • Blood in your urine

Self-care

If your groin pain is caused by a strain or sprain, these self-care measures might help:

  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others).
  • Place an ice pack or bag of frozen peas, wrapped in a protective layer such as a towel, on the sore area for 20 to 30 minutes two to four times a day.
  • Temporarily stop participation in athletic activities. Rest is essential to heal any strains or sprains to your groin.

Get the latest health advice from Mayo Clinic delivered to your inbox.

Sign up for free, and stay up-to-date on research advancements, health tips and current health topics, like COVID-19, plus expert advice on managing your health.

To provide you with the most relevant and helpful information and to understand which information is beneficial, we may combine your e-mail and website usage information with other information we have about you. If you are a Mayo Clinic Patient, this could include Protected Health Information (PHI). If we combine this information with your PHI, we will treat all of that information as PHI, and will only use or disclose that information as set forth in our notice of privacy practices. You may opt-out of e-mail communications at any time by clicking on the Unsubscribe link in the e-mail.

Jan. 12, 2021