Proper Use

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine in a hospital. It is sometimes given through a catheter placed into your lower back for an epidural or a spinal block.

This medicine should cause numbness only to the area where it is injected. You may experience temporary loss of sensation or movement in the injected area. This type of numbing procedure is called local anesthesia. It is not meant to cause you to fall asleep or become unconscious.

You may experience temporary loss of sensation and movement, usually in the lower half of your body, if you receive this medicine into your lower back (epidural). It may be easier to hurt yourself while your treated body area is still numb. Be careful to avoid injury until you have regained all the feeling and are no longer numb.

To avoid injury after dental work, do not chew solid foods until normal feeling has returned to the area. Do not test the feeling in your mouth by biting or poking the treated area (up to 7 hours).

If you are receiving this medicine as an epidural to ease labor pains, it may take longer than normal for you to push your baby out. It is also possible that the baby may have unwanted effects after birth (including sleepiness, slow responses). Talk to your doctor if you have questions about how this medicine might affect your baby.