Overview

Optic neuritis is an inflammation that damages the optic nerve, a bundle of nerve fibers that transmits visual information from your eye to your brain. Pain and temporary vision loss in one eye are common symptoms of optic neuritis.

Optic neuritis is linked to multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease that causes inflammation and damage to nerves in your brain and spinal cord. Signs and symptoms of optic neuritis can be the first indication of multiple sclerosis, or they can occur later in the course of MS. Besides MS, optic neuritis can occur with other infections or immune diseases, such as lupus.

Most people who have a single episode of optic neuritis eventually recover their vision. Treatment with steroid medications may speed up vision recovery after optic neuritis.

Nov. 04, 2016
References
  1. Osborne B, et al. Optic neuritis: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 19, 2016.
  2. Osborne B, et al. Optic neuritis: Prognosis and treatment. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 19, 2016.
  3. Optic neuritis. American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. https://www.aapos.org/terms/conditions/84. Accessed Aug. 19, 2016.
  4. Gal RL, et al. Corticosteroids for treating optic neuritis (review). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. http://www.cochrane.org/CD001430/EYES_corticosteroids-treating-optic-neuritis. Accessed Aug. 19, 2016.
  5. Optic neuritis. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/eye-disorders/optic-nerve-disorders/optic-neuritis. Accessed Aug. 19, 2016.