Cynthia Hogan, Ph.D., Audiology, Mayo Clinic

Dr. Hogan: "Hearing aids, because they're digital, can be adjusted over a wide range of hearing loss."

That's one reason why audiologist Dr. Cynthia Hogan says with these devices, one-size-fits-all does not apply.

Dr. Hogan: "So there isn't one best hearing aid for older people versus younger people. We try to choose a hearing aid that's going to fit the person's needs."

Important decisions include whether the device will have rechargeable batteries or ones that need to be replaced, and whether the hearing aid will sit behind or in the ear.

Dr. Hogan: "This is a full-shell, in-the-ear hearing aid. And, so, it fits all into the ear."

One of the benefits of this device is wearers can answer and listen to a phone call as they have their whole life. Some hearing aids can even connect to a person's cellphone.

Dr. Hogan: "They can watch videos or things like that directly from their phone to their hearing aid."

An audiologist like Dr. Hogan can help you sort through all the options and create a personal solution for your hearing problem.

For the Mayo Clinic News Network, I'm Jeff Olsen.

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April 26, 2019