Treatment

The chromosome error that causes triple X syndrome can't be repaired, so the syndrome itself has no cure. Treatment is based on symptoms and needs. Options that may be helpful include:

  • Periodic screenings. Your daughter's doctor may recommend periodic screenings throughout childhood. If any developmental delays, learning disabilities or health problems occur, she can then receive prompt treatment.
  • Early intervention services. These services may include speech, occupational, physical or developmental therapy, starting in the early months of life or as soon as needs are identified.
  • Educational assistance. If your daughter has a learning disability, she can receive educational help to learn techniques and strategies to be successful in school and daily life.
  • Supportive environment and counseling. Girls with triple X syndrome may be more prone to anxiety, as well as behavior and emotional problems. So make sure your daughter has a supportive environment. And psychological counseling may help teach you and your family how to demonstrate love and encouragement, and discourage behaviors that might negatively impact learning and social functioning.
  • Assistance and support in daily functioning. If your daughter has developmental delays, this assistance and support may include help with activities of daily living, social opportunities and employment.
Dec. 03, 2015
References
  1. Triple X syndrome. Genetics Home Reference. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/triple-x-syndrome. Accessed Sept. 11, 2015.
  2. Trisomy X. National Organization for Rare Disorders. https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/trisomy-x/. Accessed Sept. 11, 2015.
  3. Triple X syndrome. Merck Manual Consumer Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/children-s-health-issues/chromosomal-and-genetic-abnormalities/triple-x-syndrome. Accessed Sept. 11, 2015.
  4. Van Rijn S, et al. The social behavioral phenotype in boys and girls with an extra X chromosome (Klinefelter syndrome and trisomy X): A comparison with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2014;44:310.
  5. Otter M, et al. Triple X syndrome: A review of the literature. European Journal of Human Genetics. 2010;18:265.
  6. Van Rijn S, et al. Executive dysfunction and the relation with behavioral problems in children with 47,XXY and 47,XXX. Genes, Brain and Behavior. 2015;14:200.
  7. Hoecker JL (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Sept. 25, 2015.
  8. Pichurin PN (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 20, 2015.