Preparing for your appointment

If you suspect you have malaria or that you've been exposed, you're likely to start by seeing your family doctor. However, in some cases when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred to an infectious disease specialist.

What you can do

Before your appointment, you might want to write a list that answers the following questions:

  • What are your symptoms, and when did they start?
  • Have you recently traveled to or moved from a region in which malaria is common?
  • Have you ever had malaria before?
  • What types of medications and supplements do you take?

What to expect from your doctor

During the physical exam, your doctor may check your spleen and neurological functions, as well as look for other causes of fever.

Jan. 05, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Malaria. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  2. Longo DL, et al., eds. Malaria. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  3. Tintinalli JE, et al. Malaria. In: Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 7th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2011. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  4. Malaria. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/infectious-diseases/extraintestinal-protozoa/malaria. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  5. Malaria. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/malaria. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  6. Breman JG. Clinical manifestations of malaria. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  7. Daily J. Treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.