Preparing for your appointment

When you call your family doctor or child's pediatrician to make your appointment, ask if you need to do anything to prevent infecting others in the waiting room.

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Make a list of the following in preparation for your appointment:

  • Symptoms you or your child is experiencing
  • All medications, vitamins and supplements that your or your child is taking
  • Key medical information, including other conditions
  • Questions to ask your doctor

Questions to ask your doctor

  • What might be causing the sores?
  • Are tests needed to confirm the diagnosis?
  • What is the best course of action?
  • What can I do to prevent the infection from spreading?
  • What skin care routines do you recommend while the condition heals?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • When did the sores start?
  • What did the sores look like when they started?
  • Have you had any recent cuts, scrapes or insect bites to the affected area?
  • Are the sores painful or itchy?
  • What, if anything, makes the sores better or worse?
  • Does someone in your family already have impetigo?
  • Has this problem occurred in the past?
May 10, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Impetigo. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  2. Baddour LM. Impetigo. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  3. Hartman-Adams H, et al. Impetigo: Diagnosis and treatment. American Family Physician. 2014;90:229.
  4. Ferri FF. Impetigo. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  5. Habif TP. Bacterial infections. In: Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  6. Kliegman RM, et al. Cutaneous bacterial infections. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  7. Bennett JE, et al. Cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and subcutaneous tissue infections. In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.