Treatment

Your doctor can remove excess wax using a small, curved instrument called a curet or by using suction while inspecting the ear. Your doctor can also flush out the wax using a water pick or a rubber-bulb syringe filled with warm water.

If earwax buildup is a recurring problem, your doctor may recommend that you use a wax-removal medication, such as carbamide peroxide (Debrox Earwax Removal Kit, Murine Ear Wax Removal System). Because these drops can irritate the delicate skin of the eardrum and ear canal, use them only as directed.

Alternative medicine

Some people use ear candling, a technique that involves placing a lighted, hollow, cone-shaped candle into the ear, to try to remove earwax. The theory is that the heat from the flame will create a vacuum seal and the earwax will adhere to the candle.

However, ear candling is not a recommended treatment for earwax blockage. Research has found that ear candling doesn't work, and it may result in injury, such as burns, ear canal obstructions and even perforations.

Talk to your doctor before trying any alternative remedies for removing earwax.

July 22, 2017
References
  1. Earwax and care. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery. http://www.entnet.org/content/earwax-and-care. Accessed Feb. 22, 2017.
  2. Dinces EA. Cerumen. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 22, 2017.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Cerumen impaction. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.