Overview

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in one or more of the deep veins in your body, usually in your legs. Deep vein thrombosis can cause leg pain or swelling, but also can occur with no symptoms.

Deep vein thrombosis can develop if you have certain medical conditions that affect how your blood clots. It can also happen if you don't move for a long time, such as after surgery or an accident, or when you're confined to bed.

Deep vein thrombosis can be very serious because blood clots in your veins can break loose, travel through your bloodstream and lodge in your lungs, blocking blood flow (pulmonary embolism).

July 12, 2017
References
  1. Deep vein thrombosis. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/dvt/. Accessed March 21, 2017.
  2. Kearon C, et al. Clinical presentation and diagnosis of the nonpregnant adult with suspected deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2017.
  3. Deep vein thrombosis. Vascular Disease Foundation. http://vasculardisease.org/about-vascular-disease/2011-05-05-02-02-59/deep-vein-thrombosis-dvt. Accessed March 22, 2017.
  4. Lip GYH, et al. Overview of the treatment of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT). https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2017.
  5. DVT/PE facts. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/facts.html. Accessed March 21, 2017.
  6. Diagnosis and treatment: DVT. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/diagnosis-treatment.html. Accessed March 22, 2017.