Expertise and rankings

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

Mayo Clinic doctors use the most advanced techniques available to find colon polyps. During a colonoscopy, other techniques, such as high-definition narrow band imaging or special staining, may be used to enhance polyp detection.

Mayo specialists may also use a special microscope (probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy) to distinguish noncancerous from cancerous polyps. The probe provides the same level of detail as a traditional microscope outside the body.

Mayo Clinic surgeons are committed to using minimally invasive procedures, such as laparoscopy, to treat even very large polyps and early cancers.

Research leaders

Mayo Clinic researchers are working to improve diagnosis and treatment of colon polyps. Specific efforts include developing and assessing enhanced screening methods for colon polyps and for hereditary polyp disorders, as well as the natural history of FAP.

Mayo Clinic patients in Minnesota are placed on a colorectal cancer prevention registry and updated on new screening techniques and procedures. Mayo researchers are working to discover more genetic mutations that cause hereditary polyp disorders.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for digestive disorders in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for digestive disorders by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for digestive disorders.

Aug. 18, 2017
References
  1. Macrae FA. Approach to the patient with colonic polyps. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 18, 2017.
  2. Colon polyps. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/colon-polyps. Accessed March 18, 2017.
  3. Colon polyps. American College of Gastroenterology. http://patients.gi.org/topics/colon-polyps/. Accessed March 18, 2017.
  4. Polyps of the colon and rectum. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. https://www.fascrs.org/patients/disease-condition/polyps-colon-and-rectum. Accessed March 18, 2017.
  5. Colorectal cancer: Screening. Rockville, Md.: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/RecommendationStatementFinal/colorectal-cancer-screening. Accessed April 5, 2017.
  6. Feldman M, et al. Colonic polyps and polyposis syndromes. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 18, 2017.
  7. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Colorectal cancer. In: Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 18, 2017.
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  9. AskMayoExpert. Colorectal polyp surveillance. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  10. Brown A. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 25, 2017.
  11. Rajan E (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 10, 2017.