Preparing for your appointment

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment take these steps:

  • Write down any signs and symptoms you or your child is experiencing. Include signs and symptoms even if they seem minor, such as low-grade fever or fatigue.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor. Your time with your doctor is limited, so it can be useful to prepare a list of questions.

For CMV, questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What is likely causing my symptoms?
  • What tests do I need?
  • Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
  • What is the best course of action?
  • Will I infect others?
  • Are there any restrictions I need to follow?
  • I have other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor will likely ask you a number of questions, including:

  • How long have you had your symptoms?
  • Do you work or live with young children?
  • Have you had a blood transfusion or organ transplant recently?
  • Do you have a medical condition that compromises your immune system, such as HIV or AIDS?
  • Are you receiving chemotherapy?
  • Do you practice safe sex?
  • Are you pregnant or breast-feeding?

In addition, if you think you have been exposed during pregnancy:

  • When do you think you may have been exposed?
  • Have you had symptoms of the condition?
  • Have you been tested for CMV before?
April 12, 2017
References
  1. Bennett JE, et al., eds. Cytomegalovirus (CMV). In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.
  2. Goldman L, et al., eds. Cytomegalovirus. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.
  3. Friel TJ. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of cytomegalovirus in immunocompetent adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.
  4. Kliegman RM, et al. Cytomegalovirus. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.
  5. Bialas KM, et al. Perinatal cytomegalovirus and varicella zoster virus infections: Epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. Clinics in Perinatology. 2015;42:61.
  6. Demmler-Harrison GJ. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: Clinical features and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.
  7. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and congenital CMV infection: Babies born with CMV (congenital CMV infection). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/cmv/congenital-infection.html. Accessed Dec. 13, 2016.
  8. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and congenital CMV infection: About CMV. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/cmv/overview.html. Accessed Dec. 13, 2016.
  9. Sheffield JS, et al. Cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.
  10. Feldman DM, et al. Toxoplasmosis, parvovirus, and cytomegalovirus in pregnancy. Clinics in Laboratory Medicine. 2016;36:407.
  11. Caliendo AM. Approach to the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.
  12. Demmler-Harrison GJ. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: Management and outcomes. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 12, 2016.