Self-management

Prevention

Cholera is rare in the United States with the few cases related to travel outside the U.S. or to contaminated and improperly cooked seafood from the Gulf Coast waters.

If you're traveling to cholera-endemic areas, your risk of contracting the disease is extremely low if you follow these precautions:

  • Wash hands with soap and water frequently, especially after using the toilet and before handling food. Rub soapy, wet hands together for at least 15 seconds before rinsing. If soap and water aren't available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Drink only safe water, including bottled water or water you've boiled or disinfected yourself. Use bottled water even to brush your teeth. Hot beverages are generally safe, as are canned or bottled drinks, but wipe the outside before you open them. Avoid adding ice to your beverages unless you made it yourself using safe water.
  • Eat food that's completely cooked and hot and avoid street vendor food, if possible. If you do buy a meal from a street vendor, make sure it's cooked in your presence and served hot.
  • Avoid sushi, as well as raw or improperly cooked fish and seafood of any kind.
  • Stick to fruits and vegetables that you can peel yourself, such as bananas, oranges and avocados. Stay away from salads and fruits that can't be peeled, such as grapes and berries.
  • Be wary of dairy foods, including ice cream, which is often contaminated, and unpasteurized milk.

Cholera vaccine

For adults traveling to areas affected by cholera, a vaccine is now available in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration recently approved Vaxchora, a vaccine for the prevention of cholera. It is a liquid dose taken by mouth at least 10 days before travel.

A few countries offer oral vaccines as well. Contact your doctor or local office of public health for more information about these vaccines. Keep in mind that no country requires immunization against cholera as a condition for entry.

March 09, 2017
References
  1. Kliegman RM, et al. Cholera. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 9, 2016.
  2. Ferri FF. Cholera. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 9, 2016.
  3. Cholera — Vibrio cholera infection. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/cholera/index.html. Accessed Nov. 9, 2016.
  4. Cholera. World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs107/en/. Accessed Nov. 10, 2016.
  5. LaRocque R, et al. Overview of cholera. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 10, 2016.
  6. WHO position paper on oral rehydration salts to reduce mortality from cholera. World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/cholera/technical/en/. Accessed Nov. 10, 2016.
  7. FDA approves vaccine to prevent cholera for travelers. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm506305.htm. Accessed Nov. 10, 2016.