Precautions

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

It is very important that you or your child return to your doctor’s office at the right time if you or your child needs a second dose of the vaccine. Be sure to notify your doctor of any side effects that may occur after you or your child receive this vaccine.

You should not receive this vaccine if you are using medicine that weakens the immune system (including cancer medicine or steroid medicine).

Do not become pregnant for 3 months after receiving varicella virus vaccine. There is a chance that this vaccine may cause problems during pregnancy. If you think you have become pregnant, tell your doctor right away. Your doctor may want you to join a pregnancy registry for patients receiving this vaccine.

Tell your doctor that you or your child have received this vaccine:

  • If you are to receive blood transfusions or other blood products within 5 months of receiving this vaccine.
  • If you are to receive varicella-zoster immune globulin (VZIG) or other immune globulins within 2 months after receiving this vaccine.

This vaccine may cause a serious allergic reaction, including anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Call your doctor right away if you have a rash, itching, hoarseness, trouble breathing, trouble swallowing, or any swelling of your hands, face, or mouth after you receive the vaccine.

Do not use aspirin or medicines containing aspirin (eg, certain cold medicines) for 6 weeks after receiving this vaccine. Carefully check the label of any pain, headache, or cold medicine you or your child use to be sure it does not contain aspirin or salicylic acid.

You or your child may be able to pass the virus to other people after getting this vaccine. You or your child should avoid close contact with people at high risk for getting chickenpox for 6 weeks after receiving this vaccine. People who are most at risk of catching the virus from you are pregnant women, newborn babies, and people whose bodies cannot fight infection (eg, people with bone marrow disease, AIDS). Talk to your doctor about this risk.

You will need to have a skin test for tuberculosis before the vaccine is given, or on the same day the vaccine is given, or at least 4 weeks after you receive this vaccine. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your home has ever had a positive reaction to a tuberculosis skin test.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.