Precautions

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to allow changes in your dose and to check for any unwanted effects.

Do not stop taking this medicine without first checking with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to reduce gradually the amount you are taking before stopping completely. Stopping this medicine suddenly may cause fever, confusion, or severe muscle stiffness.

People taking ropinirole have reported falling asleep without warning during activities of daily living, including driving, which sometimes resulted in accidents. This may happen as late as one year after taking the medicine. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert, well-coordinated, or able to think or see well.

Check with your doctor before using this medicine with alcohol or other medicines that affect the central nervous system (CNS). This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of medicines that affect the CNS are antihistamines or medicine for allergies or colds, sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicines, prescription pain medicine or narcotics, medicine for seizures or barbiturates, muscle relaxants, or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics.

Check with your doctor right away if you have confusion, trouble breathing, a fast heartbeat, a high fever, high or low blood pressure, increased sweating, or severe muscle stiffness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur, especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position. These symptoms are more likely to occur when you begin taking this medicine, or when the dose is increased. Getting up slowly may help. If you should have this problem, check with your doctor.

Hallucinations (seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there) may occur in some patients. This is more common with elderly patients. If you have hallucinations, check with your doctor.

Smoking may decrease the treatment effects of this medicine. It is best to avoid smoking while you are using it. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

This medicine may increase your risk for skin cancer, including melanoma. It is important that your doctor check your skin regularly if you have Parkinson's disease. Check your doctor right away if you have a new mole, change in size, shape, or color of existing mole, or mole that leaks fluid or bleeds.

Some people who have used this medicine had unusual changes in their behavior, including an urge to gamble, spend money, binge eat, or an increased sex drive. Talk with your doctor if this is a concern for you.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

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